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Introduction Gastrointestinal surgery in dogs and cats is extremely common in both elective and nonelective scenarios. Gastrointestinal surgery is most commonly classified as a clean-contaminated procedure (surgery under normal conditions

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

gastrointestinal surgery include preoperative peritonitis, hypoalbuminemia, intraoperative hypotension, and presence of a foreign body. 4–7,10 Most previous studies have focused on preoperative clinicopathologic abnormalities and intraoperative variables

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Gastrointestinal surgery is commonly performed in small animal veterinary practice for diagnostic or therapeutic reasons. Although gastrointestinal surgery may be routine, a risk of potentially fatal postoperative complications exists, the most

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

.6%]). Fourteen of the 83 (16.9%) soft tissue surgeries were classified as primary gastrointestinal surgery involving disease of the esophagus, stomach, small or large intestines, or pancreas. Of the 69 dogs undergoing soft tissue surgery not involving

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

) 0.300 Brachycephalic breed 14 (32) 6 (12) 0.113 History of vomiting or regurgitation 4 (9) 11 (22) 0.097 Surgery  Abdominal surgery     0.195  Gastrointestinal surgery 5 (11) 6 (12)    Other

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

associated with gastrointestinal surgery include gastric necrosis, gastric wound dehiscence, and intraoperative or postoperative gastric leakage resulting in peritonitis, ulceration at anastomotic sites, gastric outlet obstruction, and pancreatitis. 27

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

, open gastrointestinal surgery has been associated with more postoperative pain and greater analgesic requirements ascribed to increased tissue trauma, a higher risk of incisional complications, and prolonged hospitalization due to ileus, compared with

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

artery and vein. 1 The cause for mesenteric volvulus is unknown, but several associations in dogs have been suspected, including trauma, recent gastrointestinal surgery, dietary indiscretion, large or giant breeds, intestinal adhesions, lymphocytic

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

treatment with corticosteroids. The absence of this combination of variables may help identify dogs that will not survive > 2 years. See page 480 Risk factors for septic peritonitis and failure to survive following gastrointestinal surgery in dogs

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

impair gastric function. Gastrointestinal surgery should be considered as a treatment option for guinea pigs with similar gastric neoplasms. See page 1415 Equine Signalment, clinical features, and outcome for male horses with urethral

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association