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Introduction Fungal infections of the lower respiratory tract, usually caused by Aspergillus spp, are frequently seen in psittacine patients, with certain species, such as African grey parrots, being more commonly affected. 1 Aspergillosis

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Fungal endometritis is an important cause of subfertility in mares because of difficulties in initial detection of infection and failure to attain complete resolution of the uterine infection following treatment. On the basis of culture of

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Although there are occasional descriptions of fungal keratitis in several domestic animal species, 1–7 keratomycosis is reported to occur frequently only in horses. 8–10 The higher prevalence of fungal keratitis in horses is speculated to result

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

keratectomy led to a diagnosis of dematiaceous fungal keratitis, and the dog was successfully treated with topical administration of voriconazole. A—In the left eye during initial ophthalmic examination at the teaching hospital prior to keratectomy and

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

( Figure 2 ) . Considering the patient age, breed and multifocal clinical presentation, the primary differential diagnosis was infectious osteomyelitis (fungal Aspergillus spp were considered most likely due to the patient signalment) with suspicion of

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

that the rate of false-positive results in dogs with nasal tumors was 15%. Fungal culture of nasal tissue samples has also been used to establish the diagnosis of nasal aspergillosis in dogs. However, positive results of fungal culture alone are not

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

exacerbations, and horses with fungal particles in their tracheal aspirates are more likely to be diagnosed with equine asthma than those without fungi in their trachea. 4 However, fungal spores have been observed in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) from

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

bacteria were detected after Gram staining. No growth was detected on bacterial culture of synovial fluid; therefore, samples of synovial fluid were submitted for fungal culture. The horse was treated with phenylbutazone (4.4 mg/kg [2.0 mg/lb], IV, q 12 h

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

anomalous disease (eg, congenital hydrocephalus or intra-arachnoid diverticula), focal granuloma or abscess formation (bacterial or fungal), neoplasia (eg, lymphoma or glioma), multifocal infection (viral, bacterial, protozoal, or fungal), and metabolic

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

-inducing moldy hay grown in Ontario during 1 summer season. The second objective was to create a standardized challenge model for experimental induction of RAO with inhaled fungal spores, LPS, and silica microspheres in horses. To determine the effectiveness of

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research