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B iological samples, such as platelet-rich plasma (PRP), are typically frozen at either –80 °C or –20 °C with continuous temperature monitoring of the freezer with alarms in a research setting. 1 , 2 However, in veterinary practice, these samples

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

remaining 2 specimens were designated for cross-sectional anatomic studies following the same planes of the CT studies: transverse ( Figures 3–8 ) and sagittal ( Figures 9 and 10 ). These latter specimens were placed on a plastic support, moved to a freezer

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Summary

Recent evidence concerning the pathogenesis of equine degenerative myeloencephalopathy indicated that low blood α-tocopherol values are a factor in the disease process. Variables that could be introduced by a veterinarian procuring, transporting, or storing samples were evaluated for effects on α-tocopherol concentration in equine blood. These variables included temperature; light; exposure to the rubber stopper of the evacuated blood collection tube; hemolysis; duration of freezing time, with and without nitrogen blanketing; and repeated freeze/thaw cycles. It was found that hemolysis caused the greatest change in high-performance liquid chromatography-measured serum α-tocopherol values, with mean decrease of 33% (P < 0.001). Lesser, but significant (P < 0.01) changes in serum α-tocopherol values were an approximate 10% decrease when refrigerated blood was left in contact with the red rubber stopper of the blood collection tube for 72 hours and an approximate 5% increase when blood was stored at 20 to 25 C (room temperature) for 72 hours. Repeated freeze/thaw cycles resulted in a significant (P < 0.05) 3% decrease in α-tocopherol values in heparinized plasma by the third thawing cycle. Freezer storage for a 3-month period without nitrogen blanketing resulted in slight (2%) decrease in mean serum α-tocopherol values, whereas values in serum stored for an identical period under nitrogen blanketing did not change. A significant (P < 0.001) mean decrease (10.3%) in α-tocopherol values was associated with freezer (− 16 C) storage of nitrogen blanketed serum for 6 months. Comparison of α-tocopherol values in serum vs heparinized plasma vs edta-treated plasma resulted in serum values being significantly (P < 0.001) higher (approx 4%) than values in either type of plasma. It was concluded that the optimal method for storing equine blood samples prior to α-tocopherol analysis is in an upright position in a refrigerator for up to 72 hours. If a longer period is needed prior to analysis, it is recommended that the serum or plasma be separated from blood, blanketed with nitrogen gas, and frozen in the smallest possible vial. The α-tocopherol in these samples should be stable at − 16 C for at least 3 months.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate stability of canine pancreatic lipase immunoreactivity (cPLI) in serum samples and to determine the effect of long-term administration of prednisone on serum cPLI concentrations.

Sample Population—8 canine serum samples for the stability evaluation and serum samples obtained from 6 healthy young adult heterozygous (carrier) dogs with X-linked hereditary nephritis for determining the effect of prednisone administration.

Procedures—To evaluate stability of serum cPLI concentration, an aliquot of each serum sample was stored at each of 4 temperatures between −80° and 24°C; samples were analyzed on days 0, 3, 7, 14, and 21. To determine the effect of long-term prednisone administration, pretreatment serum samples were obtained (days 0 and 14) and prednisone was administered (2.2 mg/kg, q 24 h, PO) on days 15 through 42, with serum samples obtained on days 28 and 42. Additional serum samples were obtained on days 56 and 70.

Results—Mean serum cPLI concentrations did not change significantly from day 0 to day 21 regardless of storage temperature. Serum cPLI concentrations in dogs after prednisone administration were within the reference range for all dogs at all time points, and results of repeated-measures ANOVA revealed that serum cPLI concentrations did not change significantly over time.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Serum cPLI concentrations measured in canine serum samples stored at room temperature, in a refrigerator, or in a freezer at −20° or −80°C were stable for at least 21 days. Also, long-term prednisone administration to dogs did not significantly affect serum cPLI concentrations.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

(culture and identification of bacteria) are less common. 1 Centrifuges (fixed-angle, swinging-bucket, and micro-Hct types), refrigerators, non–frost-free freezers, automated benchtop hematology and biochemistry instruments, and microscopes are among the

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Chemistry Analyzer; Diamond Diagnostics Inc) for the measurements of BUN, creatinine, and phosphorus. Additionally, plasma or serum samples were frozen in a –70 °C freezer and later shipped in a single shipment on dry ice to an external laboratory (Idexx

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

, tendon explants were snapfrozen and powdered in a freezer-mill d under liquid nitrogen prior to extraction of RNA. Following extraction, the RNA was purified over RNA-specific purification columns e and the quality assessed via UV spectrophotometry and

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

the same time they collected their routine test samples. All milk samples collected by the 3 milk buyers were frozen at −20°C and were stored frozen without thawing at their milk collection locations (n = 3; 1 collection point/buyer) in freezers

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

were then stored in a freezer at −25°C at the blood bank. All freezers were human-grade equipment that were regularly calibrated with automated temperature monitoring systems. Units of plasma were obtained from the donor dogs. These units initially

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

concentration is a minimum of 200 ng/ML. Stocks of DNA are stored at −20°C in freezers used only for this purpose; these freezers have an emergency backup power supply. Data Management At our facility, signalment, DNA information, and disease

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association