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Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The intention of this tutorial video is to illustrate the methods of examining the forelimb and neck of a horse in order to identify abnormalities that may be associated with lameness or disease.

ANIMAL

A 16-year-old quarter horse gelding was used for examination.

METHODS

The horse was examined for abnormalities by means of physical examination.

RESULTS

The examination of the forelimb and neck of the horse was successfully completed.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

This examination technique is required to identify abnormalities in the equine forelimb and can be utilized during a lameness examination.

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

The SL of the forelimb is commonly injured in horses that participate in a variety of disciplines, including racehorses and sport horses. 1–5 Suspensory ligament desmitis is often associated with decreased performance and can be a career

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

uniplanar gyroscope that is attached to the dorsal aspect of the right forelimb pastern region to measure the angular velocity on the sagittal plane. The gyroscope detects extension and flexion of the instrumented digit. Extension of the digit yields a

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

administration. 6,7 In the forelimb, no local treatment is used clinically to provide postoperative analgesia. Continuous regional anesthesia is used to control signs of pain in human 8,9 and small animal patients. 10–12 Clear, objective data support its use

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

In healthy dogs, the forelimbs bear approximately 60% of the body weight and the hind limbs bear approximately 40% of the body weight, independent of gait (eg, walking 1–4 or trotting 5–9 ). Differences among breeds attributable to the relative

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

in drug testing for the assessment of physiologic and pharmacological 10 processes (eg, perfused isolated porcine limbs). 11 Extracorporeal perfusion of equine forelimbs with autologous blood has been successfully performed for 10 hours, without

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

alternates with an aerial phase between alternations. The forelimbs have a primordial weight-bearing role and contribute less to propulsion than do the hind limbs on level ground. 2–5 Forelimbs have been traditionally regarded merely as compliant struts

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

devices, which have wireless or telemetric components for data transmission. 14–16 Results of a study 5 indicate that the use of an inertial sensor system that monitors movement of the horse's head or pelvis during a trot detected unilateral forelimb or

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

-bearing forelimb lameness, alterations in hoof kinematics occur in both the lame and nonlame limbs at a trot 12 ; therefore, alterations in hoof kinematics may also occur at a walk, and characterization of those changes might be beneficial for the diagnosis of

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

musculoskeletal injuries involve the distal aspect of the forelimbs, with ligaments and tendons as the tissues most commonly affected. 1,3–5 Equine limbs primarily move in the sagittal plane, with some capacity for abduction or adduction and limited internal or

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research