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G astrointestinal (GI) tract abnormalities are a frequent reason for owners presenting small animals to their veterinarian, and foreign body (FB) dietary indiscretion, whether causing mechanical obstruction or not, is a common concern recorded as

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Foreign body penetration secondary to self-inflicted trauma is a common means by which horses become wounded. Various foreign materials causing wounds, draining tracts, and focal swelling have been described. 1–3 These include wood, plant

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

regarding rare earth magnetic foreign bodies causing esophageal perforation and subsequent pyothorax in a dog. Ingestion of magnetic foreign bodies causing gastrointestinal perforations and subsequent septic peritonitis has been reported in dogs and has been

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

foreign body lodged in a distal branch of the right pulmonary artery ( Figure 1 ). Figure 1— Lateral (A) and ventrodorsal (B) radiographic views of the thorax of an 8-year-old castrated male Bearded Collie (dog 1) with an IV catheter fragment (white

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

, serum biochemical analysis, and canine pancreas-specific lipase test a revealed no clinically important abnormalities. Evaluation of abdominal radiographs revealed 3 approximately 2.5-to 3-cm-long thin wire foreign bodies in the region of the stomach

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

return to soundness than injuries that do not involve synovial-lined structures. 6 , 7 Although the hoof wall and sole are hard, keratinized tissue, penetrating wounds are still common. 8 Penetrating foreign bodies occur most commonly in the sole of

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

with supplemental oxygen. Thoracic radiography revealed a radi-opaque object at the level of the tracheal bifurcation ( Figure 1 ). The cat was referred to The Ohio State University Veterinary Medical Center for removal of the foreign body. Figure 1

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Corneal foreign bodies are an acquired cause of keratitis in veterinary patients. Types of corneal foreign bodies are roughly divided into 2 categories: superficial and penetrating. Penetrating foreign bodies may enter the anterior chamber and

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Foreign body ingestion is a common reason for emergency visits in small animal practice. Depending on the nature of the foreign body and risk of gastrointestinal tract obstruction or perforation, various treatments may be recommended. Treatment

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

/μL). Results of serum biochemical analyses were within reference limits. Review of the radiographs obtained by the referring veterinarian revealed a mass-like effect in the cranial portion of the thorax suggestive of esophageal foreign bodies ( Figure 1

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association