Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 108 items for :

  • "fenestration" x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All

pulposus (NP). Extrusion of NP into the vertebral canal causes compression and/or contusion of the spinal cord and subsequent neurological dysfunction. 3 , 4 Fenestration is a surgical technique that involves the complete mechanical removal of NP by making

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

management to facilitate lavage and drainage. 6 Techniques using endoscopy-guided transpharyngeal laser energy have been developed to create a fenestration into the guttural pouch, often referred to as salpingopharyngostomy, to facilitate removal and speed

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Thoracolumbar IVDH is a common surgical disease of small and chondrodystrophic breeds. Surgical decompression with removal of extruded disk material is a well-accepted treatment for patients with any severity of clinical signs. 1–6 Fenestration

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

extrusion are the C2–3 intervertebral disk space in small-breed dogs and the C6–7 intervertebral disk space in larger dogs. 4 Fenestration and ventral slot surgeries are routinely performed in patients that have cervical IVDD. Complications associated

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

here was to evaluate a modified preoperative grading system for dogs with thoracolumbar IVDH that underwent hemilaminectomy and concomitant fenestration. Our hypothesis was that the proportion of dogs that recover from hemilaminectomy and fenestration

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

SUMMARY

Intervertebral disk space widths were measured on lateral radiographs of 73 anesthetized dogs. Weight was found to have a significant (P < 0.01) effect on disk space width. Using weight-adjusted disk space width measurements for all subsequent studies, older (7- to 16-year-old) dogs and males had consistently, but not significantly, wider, disk spaces than did alternative groups. Cervical and lumbar intervertebral disk spaces tended to be wider than those in the caudal thoracic region. The widest cervical intervertebral disk spaces were C4-5 and C5-6 and the narrowest was C2-3. In the lumbar region, L2-3 was the widest disk space and L4-5 was the narrowest. Dachshunds generally had greater mean intervertebral disk space width than did other breeds of dogs.

Cervical (n = 6 dogs) and thoracolumbar (n = 6 dogs) disk fenestration resulted in narrow intervertebral disk spaces, regardless of breed. When a ventral approach was used in thoracolumbar fenestration, the mean intervertebral disk space was narrower than that resulting from use of a dorsolateral approach.

Spondylosis was found radiographically 1 to 4 years after intervertebral disk fenestration in 3 of 6 dogs that had cervical fenestrations and in 5 of 6 dogs that underwent thoracolumbar fenestration.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

fiber during transection; with minimal additional ablation and a few further incisions, a fenestration was created. The laser was set at 16 W in continuous mode, and 2,454 J was used during the procedure. The foal sustained moderate blood loss

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objectives—To evaluate a population of chondrodystrophic dogs treated for Hansen type I intervertebral disk (IVD) disease by surgical decompression with or without prophylactic fenestration and determine the rate and location of surgically confirmed recurrence of intervertebral disk extrusion.

Animals—265 dogs.

Study Design—Retrospective study.

Procedures—Medical records of dogs that underwent spinal decompression between 1995 and 1999 were reviewed.

Results—13 (4.9%) dogs were euthanatized or died prior to discharge. Fenestration was performed in 252 dogs, including 37 (14.7%) at the site of decompression only, 48 (19%) at 3 to 4 disk spaces, and 167 (66%) at 5 to 7 disk spaces. There were 12 instances of recurrent disk extrusion confirmed by removal of disk at a second surgery 3.5 to 33 months after the first surgery. Recurrence was always at a new disk space, and rates did not significantly differ between dogs that underwent single or multiple fenestrations. Two recurrences were at a previously fenestrated disk space. Seven recurrences were at a site immediately adjacent to a fenestrated disk space, and 5 recurrences were at L4-5.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Prophylactic fenestration is generally successful in preventing future disk extrusions at fenestrated disk spaces. Prospective evaluation is still required to determine whether fenestration decreases the overall rate of recurrence. Prophylactic fenestration could promote disk extrusion at adjacent, nonfenestrated disk spaces. This could have a substantial clinical impact if recurrence develops at L4-5. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2004;224:1808–1814)

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective

To study biomechanical characteristics of the normal and surgically altered canine thoracolumbar vertebral column to determine the effects of surgery and trauma on lateral stability.

Animals

The T13-L1 vertebral motion units of 48 mixed-breed dogs were dissected free of surrounding musculature and prepared for biomechanical testing by cross-pinning the vertebral bodies and mounting in polymethylmethacrylate.

Procedure

Normal and surgically altered spinal specimens were subjected to lateral bending. The mean slope of the bending moment versus angular displacement curve and the load to failure were compared between treatment groups and significance was determined by the method of least squares (P < 0.05). Specimens were surgically altered by facetectomy, lateral fenestration, diskectomy, and combinations of these procedures. Each specimen was subjected to lateral bending to failure at a rate of 2.5 cm/min in a swing arm bending jig designed to simulate 4-point bending and subject the specimen to pure bending.

Results

Only specimens undergoing diskectomy had a significant decrease in slope and load at failure. Unilateral and bilateral facetectomies and fenestration induced a nonsignificant decrease in stiffness, compared with control specimens.

Conclusions

Fenestrations and facetectomies do not appear to increase the risk of injury to the canine thoracolumbar spinal cord during lateral bending.

Clinical Relevance

Fenestrations and facetectomies, as used in routine laminectomies, may be performed without concern for significant destabilization of the spine in lateral bending; however, it is possible that thoracolumbar spinal fractures involving only the vertebral body may significantly destabilize the spine in all modes of bending. (Am J Vet Res 1996;57:1228-1232)

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To assess risk factors for recurrence of clinical signs associated with thoracolumbar intervertebral disk disease (IVDD) in dogs that had decompressive laminectomy without attempted prophylactic treatment of other disk spaces.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—229 dogs.

Procedure—Medical records of dogs that had decompressive laminectomy without prophylactic fenestration for a first episode of IVDD and were available for follow-up were reviewed. Information on 7 clinical and 8 radiographic potential risk factors were recorded.

Results—Clinical signs associated with recurrence of IVDD developed in 44 (19.2%) dogs. Ninety-six percent of recurrences developed within 3 years after surgery. Recurrence developed in 25% of Dachshunds and 15% of dogs of other breeds combined. Number of opacified disks was a significant risk factor for recurrence. Risk increased with number of opacified disks in an almost linear manner; each opacified disk increased risk by 1.4 times. Dogs with 5 or 6 opacified disks at the time of first surgery had a recurrence rate of 50%.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—When all likely episodes of recurrence are considered and a long follow-up period is achieved, true rate of recurrence of IVDD appears to be higher than in many previous reports. Dogs with multiple opacified disks at the time of first surgery should be considered a high-risk subpopulation. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2004;225: 1231–1236)

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association