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Abstract

Objective—To determine whether detection of virusspecific serum antibodies correlates with resistance to challenge with virulent feline herpesvirus 1 (FHV-1), feline calicivirus (FCV), and feline parvovirus (FPV) in cats and to determine percentages of client-owned cats with serum antibodies to FHV-1, FCV, and FPV.

Design—Prospective experimental study.

Animals—72 laboratory-reared cats and 276 clientowned cats.

Procedures—Laboratory-reared cats were vaccinated against FHV-1, FCV, and FPV, using 1 of 3 commercial vaccines, or maintained as unvaccinated controls. Between 9 and 36 months after vaccination, cats were challenged with virulent virus. Recombinant-antigen ELISA for detection of FHV-1-, FCV-, and FPV-specific antibodies were developed, and results were compared with results of hemagglutination inhibition (FPV) and virus neutralization (FHV-1 and FCV) assays and with resistance to viral challenge.

Results—For vaccinated laboratory-reared cats, predictive values of positive results were 100% for the FPV and FCV ELISA and 90% for the FHV-1 ELISA. Results of the FHV-1, FCV, and FPV ELISA were positive for 195 (70.7%), 255 (92.4%), and 189 (68.5%), respectively, of the 276 client-owned cats.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that for cats that have been vaccinated, detection of FHV-1-, FCV-, and FPV-specific antibodies is predictive of whether cats are susceptible to disease, regardless of vaccine type or vaccination interval. Because most client-owned cats had detectable serum antibodies suggestive of resistance to infection, use of arbitrary booster vaccination intervals is likely to lead to unnecessary vaccination of some cats. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2002;219:38–42)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

with 5% sheep blood and MacConkey agar plates and incubated at 37°C. No bacterial growth was identified after 7 days. Fresh tissue samples of lungs, spleen, intestinal tract, brain, and heart underwent fluorescent antibody testing for feline parvovirus

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

considered most likely, whereas infection with bacteria (including Streptococcus spp, Escherichia coli , and Bartonella spp), fungi (eg, Blastomyces dermatitidis ), or viruses (including feline parvovirus, FIV, and feline infectious peritonitis virus

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

. Canine viral enteritis . In: Greene CE , ed. Infectious diseases of the dog and cat . 3rd ed. Philadelphia : WB Saunders Co , 2006 ; 63 – 73 . 19 Addie DD Toth S Thompson H , et al . Detection of feline parvovirus in dying pedigree

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

.2000.0084 2. Greene CE , Addie DD . Feline parvovirus infections . In: Greene CE , ed. Infectious diseases of the dog and cat . 3rd ed. St Louis : Saunders , 2006 ; 78 – 88 . 3. Gaskell RM , Povey RC . Transmission of feline

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

erythroblasts and megakaryocytes have been mostly described with FIV and FeLV infections, as well as with feline parvovirus infections. 5 Among these diseases, FeLV infection in particular can cause selective suppression of erythropoiesis and thrombocytopenia

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

can cause cerebellar hypoplasia, 42 and as cerebellar development continues during the first 2 weeks after birth, infection in young neonates may also occasionally result in the condition. Feline parvovirus is highly contagious, remains stable and

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

herpesvirus 1, feline calicivirus, and feline parvovirus infection in cats . J Am Vet Med Assoc 2002 ; 220 : 38 – 42 . 10.2460/javma.2002.220.38 9. Maggs DJ Nasisse MP Kass PH . Efficacy of oral supplementation with L-lysine in cats latently

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

live culture of canine adenovirus type 2, parainfluenza, and B bronchiseptica ; samples were tested for B bronchiseptica only. † The aerosolized vaccine suspension contained modified-live feline herpesvirus-1, feline calicivirus, and feline

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research