Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 293 items for :

  • "exploratory laparotomy" x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All

increased sensitivity for metastatic disease 17 – 19 and superiority for monitoring response to therapy. 20 While various imaging modalities aim to achieve diagnosis and/or prognosis, an exploratory laparotomy can be performed for diagnostic, prognostic

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Exploratory laparotomy is the gold standard for the diagnosis and treatment of dogs with gastrointestinal disease. This procedure is typically performed by means of a large incision, which may extend from the xyphoid to the pubis. 1 In humans

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Objective

To determine, in a population of young horses, whether a variation exists among neonates, sucklings, weanlings, and yearlings regarding recovery from anesthesia, short- and long-term survival rates, and postoperative adhesion formation following exploratory laparotomy.

Design

Retrospective study.

Animals

102 horses < 25 months old that underwent exploratory laparotomy.

Procedure

Pre-, intra-, and postoperative information was retrieved from medical records, conversations with referring veterinarians, owners, or trainers, and race records. Survival rates (recovery from anesthesia and short- and long-term survival) were compared with age, lesion type, lesion location, surgical procedure, and development of clinically important postoperative intestinal adhesions.

Results

Of the 73 horses that recovered from anesthesia, 69 were available for follow-up. Of the 69 horses, 7 (10%) died of complications associated with formation of intestinal adhesions. Age did not affect incidence of adhesion formation, lesion type, lesion location, or surgical procedure performed. Long-term survival rate after surgery for correction of a small-intestinal lesion was 34%, whereas that after surgery for correction of a large-intestinal lesion was 65%.

Clinical Implications

Surgical treatment of colic in young horses resulted in survival rates that are similar to those reported for mature horses. The incidence of clinically important postoperative adhesions was greater than that found for young horses in earlier studies. This may be the result of the younger age of our study population. Alternatively, improvements in operative techniques and postoperative management may allow a larger percentage of horses to survive long term and develop complications such as adhesion formation. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1997;211:1158–1162)

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Plasma and peritoneal fluid samples were collected before and after surgery from 6 horses undergoing a ventral midline exploratory laparotomy and from 6 anesthetized control horses. Coagulation/fibrinolytic components measured in the plasma and peritoneal fluid of these horses included the functional activity of antithrombin III, α-2 antiplasmin, plasminogen, and protein C, and the concentrations of fibrinogen and fibrin degradation products. Peritoneal fluid antithrombin III, fibrin degradation products, and plasminogen values were significantly increased after surgery (over time) in principal horses. Compared with control horses, postoperative peritoneal fluid from horses undergoing laparotomy had significantly increased antithrombin-III activity at 12 and 72 hours, α-2 antiplasmin activity at 24 hours, fibrin degradation product concentrations at 6, 12, 24, 72, 96, and 144 hours, plasminogen activity at 6, 12, 24, 48, 72, and 96 hours, and protein-C activity at 12, 24, 72, and 96 hours. There were no significant changes in the peritoneal fibrinogen concentration in principal horses. Plasma plasminogen activity was significantly decreased at 24 hours after surgery in principal horses, compared with controls. Changes were minimal in the remaining plasma coagulation/fibrinolytic components of horses undergoing laparotomy. Plasma and peritoneal fluid values of anesthetized control horses did not change.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

exploratory laparotomy for colic during this time period were reviewed. Horses with a confirmed wire foreign body in the abdomen were included as cases in the study. Cases were categorized either as horses that were discharged alive from the hospital

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

every 5 to 6 weeks. The cat was reported to have undergone ovariohysterectomy prior to its adoption from a local animal shelter 15 months before this examination. Exploratory laparotomy was performed by a local veterinarian 4 months after the cat had

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

peritoneal effusion was observed. Fine-needle aspiration biopsy of the thickened foci of the abomasal wall was not attempted because the owner opted for a surgical approach to correct the abomasal displacement. A right standing exploratory laparotomy was

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

of SII with BLIS for reduction of postoperative pain in dogs undergoing an exploratory laparotomy. The objective of this study was to compare postoperative pain in dogs undergoing exploratory laparotomy that received SII with saline or BLIS

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

evaluated at the William R. Pritchard Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital that underwent abdominal CR between January 2003 and February 2007 with subsequent exploratory laparotomy or postmortem examination were reviewed. Signalment, definitive diagnosis on

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association