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Introduction A fecalith is a firm, ovoid accumulation of ingesta or matted plant material (phytoconglobate) that can cause intraluminal obstruction of the ascending, transverse, or descending colon in equids. 1 Fecalith obstruction often

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

examine the incidence of colic in equids hospitalized for the treatment of ocular disease and to identify risk factors associated with colic in this population. Based on the factors already noted and clinical impression, the hypotheses were that equids

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

. The purpose of the study reported here was to further describe the experience at our hospital with treatment of cryptorchidism in equids. We hypothesized that abdominal palpation per rectum would be an accurate method to determine the location of the

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

GI tract. Oleander toxicosis has been detected in humans and other animals, including sheep, goats, cattle, camelids, monkeys, mice, and equids. 3,9–11,13–17 Clinical signs of oleander toxicosis include cardiac arrhythmias (including brady- and

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Thirteen equids were initially examined from October 2001 to November 2008 for signs of colic (n = 7), weight loss (6), anorexia (3), or diarrhea (2). Colic signs were classified as either mild (n = 3) or severe (4). Duration of clinical signs

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

ELLs in various long bones have been published, but a study with a large number of horses containing further clinical and epidemiological information is required. Our clinical impression was that ELLs in equids were more common than previously

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Sarcoids are locally aggressive, nonmetastatic tumors of the skin in equids. 1 Bovine papillomavirus types 1 and 2 are causally associated with sarcoid development in equids, 2 but the environment and genetics of animals also have important

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Some of the first reports of equids infected with Anaplasma phagocytophilum were from Northern California; however, clinical cases have more recently been reported in several different countries. 1–7 In the initial retrospective studies 1

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

and radiologic evaluation of the injured foot to decide the best course of treatment and management are essential. The purpose of the present study was to examine the records of equids with a penetrating injury to the central region of the foot and

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

determine the complication rate and identify risk factors associated with complications following routine castration in equids (including horses, mules, and donkeys) in an equine ambulatory practice. A complete understanding of these factors can help

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association