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Abstract

Objective—To investigate the role of Felis domesticus allergen I (Feld I) in the pathogenesis of eosinophilic granuloma complex (EGC) in cats.

Animals—7 healthy cats and 6 cats with EGC.

Procedure—Epidermis was removed from 4 areas. Rubber stoppers filled with Feld I, saline (0.9% NaCl) solution, and PBS solution were glued to the skin lesions and removed 48 hours later. Fluid within each stopper was collected. Biopsy specimens were obtained at each site, snap frozen, and stored at –70 C. Total and differential numbers of cells in fluid were counted. Biopsy specimens were stained by use of monoclonal antibodies against feline CD4, CD8 and CD3. Data were analyzed by use of multivariate repeated-measures analysis.

Results—Healthy cats had a significant increase in number of CD3+ cells, compared with number of CD4+ and CD8+ cells, and Feld I caused a significant increase in number of CD3+ cells, compared with PBS or saline solutions. Cats with EGC had a significant increase in number of CD3+ cells, compared with number of CD4+ and CD8+ cells, and Feld I caused a significant increase in number of CD3+ and CD4+ cells, compared with PBS or saline solutions. Cats with EGC had an increased CD4+ response, a significantly decreased CD8+ response, and a significantly increased CD4-to-CD8 ratio compared with healthy cats.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The increased CD4+ response, significantly decreased CD8+ response, and significantly increased CD4-to-CD8 ratio are comparable to results in atopic people and allergic cats. Therefore, Feld I could be an autoallergen responsible for chronic inflammatory reactions in cats with EGC. (Am J Vet Res 2002;63:338–341)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

. Observations on the eosinophilic granuloma complex in cats . J Am Anim Hosp Assoc . 1975 ; 11 ( 3 ): 261 – 270 . 2. Mendelsohn D , Lewis JR , Scott KI , Brown DC , Reiter AM . Clinicopathological features, risk factors and

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Eight cats had lesions on the nasal bridge, ears, and footpads, with histologic and hematologic features of a recently described seasonal form of eosinophilic granuloma complex. Four cats were examined in detail, and it was established that 2 of the 4 reacted to mosquito extract on intradermal skin testing read at 20 minutes. Neither of the 2 cats tested had deposits of immunoglobulins in lesional or perilesional skin. Lesions on all 4 cats resolved when kept at home behind insect screening, but flared up if the screening was removed. Mosquitoes that were observed to be biting and causing lesions were collected and identified. Other species of laboratory-reared mosquitoes were allowed to bite nonlesional skin of 1 affected cat, causing pruritus, erythematous crusting, and ulcerative lesions at the bite site, which was characterized histologically as eosinophilic dermatitis.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Objective

To assess pretreatment clinical and laboratory findings in cats with diabetes mellitus and to determine the influence of ketoacidosis on pretreatment findings.

Design

Retrospective case series.

Animals

104 cats with diabetes melliitus, 38 of which had ketoacidosis.

Procedure

Medical records of cats with diabetes mellitus examined over a 20-month period were reviewed. Cats that had received previous treatment for diabetes mellitus, or for which medical records were incomplete, were excluded from this study.

Results

Cats ranged in age from 1 to 19 years (median, 11 years). Male cats were twice as likely to develop diabetes as females. The most common historical signs were polyuria, polydipsia, weight loss, and diminished activity. Anorexia or poor appetite was reported more commonly than polyphagia, especially in cats with ketoacidosis. Diminished activity, anorexia, weakness, and vomiting were all significantly more common in ketoacidotic cats than in nonketoacidotic cats. Forty-four cats were considered thin, and 34 were considered obese. All cats had hyperglycemia and most had hypercholesterolemia and high activities of 1 or more hepatic enzymes. Compared with nonketoacidotic cats, ketoacidotic cats were more likely to have had low serum electrolyte values. All cats had glucosuria and 42 (40.4%) had ketonuria. Baseline serum insulin concentrations were measured in 18 cats and were low or at the low end of the reference range in 14 (77.8%) cats. Serum fructosamine concentration, determined in 22 cats, was high in 20 (90.9%) cats. Twenty-three of the 104 (22.1%) cats had concurrent disease, the most common of which were hyperthyroidism, inflammatory bowel disease, and eosinophilic granuloma complex.

Clinical Implications

In more than a third of cats, diabetes mellitus is complicated by development of ketoacidosis, which increases the severity of clinical and laboratory abnormalities. Diagnosis of diabetes mellitus is made on the basis of signalment (eg, middle-aged to old male cats), owner complaints (eg, polyuria, polydipsia, and weight loss), physical examination findings (eg, lethargy or muscle wasting), and laboratory findings {eg, hyperglycemia and glucosuria). (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1996,209:943-949)

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

clinical differential diagnoses for FIESF include mast cell tumor, eosinophilic granuloma complex, and inflammatory lesions associated with toxoplasmosis or feline infectious peritonitis. For the cat of this report, findings of cytologic examination of

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

organisms is considered diagnostic for MEED. 1 Importantly, the most common causes of eosinophilic granulomas in horses should be ruled out prior to making a diagnosis of MEED. Habronemiasis, pythiosis, equine eosinophilic granuloma complex, and mast cell

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

; trauma; and foreign bodies. 1–3 Immune-mediated diseases include eosinophilic granuloma complex and lymphoplasmacytic stomatitis. Infectious causes of stomatitis in cats include viral (calicivirus, herpesvirus, FeLV, and FIV), bacterial, and fungal

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

infiltration with eosinophils, and absence of any recognizable cause for the eosinophilia. 3 Other causes for eosinophilia in felids include flea allergy, eosinophilic granuloma complex, endoparasitism, bronchial asthma, lymphoma, mast cell tumor, eosinophilic

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

no evidence of infection. Follow-up PCR testing for FHV-1 DNA was performed a month after the referral examination, and the result remained negative. It has been suggested that FEK is a manifestation of the feline eosinophilic granuloma complex. 6

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

botryomycosis. Although the referring veterinarian’s differential diagnoses centered on plasma cell pododermatitis and feline eosinophilic granuloma complex, neither was supported on histologic examination, and the cat had no improvement during systemic

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association