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Introduction Enucleation is indicated in rabbits to alleviate the irreversibly painful and/or blinding consequences of various ocular diseases. 1 In rabbits and other mammalian species, en bloc and subconjunctival enucleation techniques are

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Introduction Enucleation is a procedure commonly performed by both veterinary ophthalmologists and general practitioners. Eye removal is an end-stage treatment warranted in cases of protracted ocular pain as a result of inflammation, glaucoma

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

A 3-year-old neutered male Lhasa Apso (dog 1) was referred for evaluation of swelling and tenderness associated with the left orbital area of several weeks' duration. Enucleation of the left eye had been performed by the referring veterinarian

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

enucleation has not been reported. The aim of the retrospective study reported here was to determine the prevalence of and covariates associated with an OCR occurring in a heterogeneous population of dogs during enucleation. The hypothesis was that

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Introduction Enucleation of the eye is a common procedure that is performed for end-stage uveitis, glaucoma, severe ocular trauma, ocular neoplasia, and other painful and blinding ocular diseases in horses. 1 For a more cosmetic outcome, an

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Enucleation is one of the more common ophthalmic surgeries performed in both general and specialty veterinary practices. This procedure is often performed in dogs in response to an intractably painful eye secondary to glaucoma, corneal rupture

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Enucleation, a common procedure in small animal practice, can cause patients severe postoperative pain owing to rich sensory innervation of the ocular globe and orbit. 1–3 Such pain can be challenging to control 4 and, if not managed, may lead

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

, and orbit are richly innervated, thus creating the potential for substantial discomfort following ocular procedures such as enucleation. 2 Animals with postoperative ocular pain will often self-traumatize the surgical area, leading to postoperative

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Eye enucleation is a common procedure in dogs that is performed by veterinarians of many specialties, including ophthalmologists, surgeons, emergency clinicians, and general practitioners. Although enucleation is a common surgery, controlling

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Eye enucleations performed on 109 dogs, 29 horses, and 23 cats involved placement, of 136 silicone orbital implants and 7 mesh implants. Mean follow-up times were 2.4 years (range, 3 weeks to 9 years) in dogs, 3.4 years (range, 10 days to 10.5 years) in horses, and 1.5 years (range, 3 weeks to 7.5 years) in cats. Implants failed in 1 of 96 dogs (1.04%), 3 of 29 horses (10.3%), and 3 of 18 cats (16.7%). Implant failure was attributable to various causes in all species; however, cats appeared to be more prone to late extrusion than were dogs and horses. Implantation of an orbital prosthesis was a safe and inexpensive method for improving cosmetic appearance after enucleation in dogs, horses, and cats.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association