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shared a lot of laughs. I’ll always remember loving the long hours doing fieldwork because our team kept our spirits up with humor.” Mara’s efforts were in support of the university’s Center for Vector-borne and Emerging Infectious Diseases (CVEID). The

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

countries are much more likely to be from endemic Brucella strains. Because emerging infectious diseases first seen in veterinarians could indicate an animal pathogen has gained the ability to spread across species, veterinarians may serve as unprotected

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

undoubtedly improve the extent to which EVMR software is adopted and used by veterinarians to contribute to the improvement of animal and human health. ABBREVIATIONS CI Confidence interval EID Emerging infectious disease EMR Electronic medical

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

scientist, ProMED-mail evolved from a typical electronic information site into an independent, commonly consulted source of disease information. 2,3 By the mid-1990s, an eclectic mix of unregulated Web sites, the recently launched Emerging Infectious

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Atlantic bottlenose dolphins ( Tursiops truncatus ) inhabiting the Indian River Lagoon, Florida . J Wildl Dis 2006 ; in press . 20 Harwell CD Kim K Burkholder JM , et al . Emerging infectious diseases—climate links

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is an international and quintessential One Health problem. This paper synthesizes recent knowledge in One Health, binational RMSF concerns, and veterinary and human medical perspectives to this fatal, reemerging problem.

RMSF, a life-threatening tick-borne disease caused by the bacterium Rickettsia rickettsii, emerged during the first decade of the 21st century in impoverished communities in the southwestern US and northern Mexico. Lack of an index of suspicion, delay in diagnosis, and delayed initiation of antibiotic treatment contribute to fatality. Campaigns targeting dog neutering, restraint to residents’ properties, and on-dog and on-premises treatment with acaricides temporarily reduce prevalence but are often untenable economically. Contemporary Mexican RMSF is hyperendemic in small communities and cities, whereas epidemics occur in the western US primarily in small tribal communities. In in both locations, the epidemics are fueled by free-roaming dogs and massive brown dog tick populations. In the US, RMSF has a case fatality rate of 5% to 7%; among thousands of annual cases in Mexico, case fatality often exceeds 30%. , Numerous case patients in US border states have recent travel histories to northern Mexico.

Veterinarians and physicians should alert the public to RMSF risk, methods of prevention, and the importance of urgent treatment with doxycycline if symptomatic. One Health professionals contribute ideas to manage ticks and rickettsial disease and provide broad education for the public and medical professionals. Novel management approaches include vaccine development and deployment, acaricide resistance monitoring, and modeling to guide targeted dog population management and other interventions.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Substantial changes in the epizootic characteristics of rabies have transpired in the United States during the past 50 years. Traditional veterinary practices and public health recommendations have effectively controlled rabies in dogs and prevented associated human fatalities; however, they have been unable to adequately address the problem of rabies in wildlife. Attributable in part to a renewed focus on emerging infectious diseases, a conference was held at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in 1993 to begin discussion focused on the reemergence of rabies and to formulate new suggestions for prevention and control of rabies in the United States. Three major working groups were formed from a national committee of professionals representing a broad array of biomedical disciplines. These groups concentrated on prevention of rabies in human beings, education, laboratory diagnosis of rabies, and rabies control in animals. The groups described the perceived minimum requirements to promote prevention and control of rabies in the United States into the next century. The following article describes the needs and recommendations identified by the prevention and education working group. Two other articles, scheduled for the Nov 15 and Dec 1, 1999 issues of JAVMA, will relay the needs and recommendations of the working groups on laboratory diagnosis of rabies and rabies in wildlife.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

guide will positively impact the quality and accuracy of downstream biopsy results. Reviewed by Jeremy Johnson, DVM, PhD, DACVP IDEXX Laboratories Inc Roseville, Calif Bats and Viruses: A New Frontier of Emerging Infectious Diseases Lin

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

emerging infectious diseases and how to prevent them. The systems are varied, including solving “mystery diseases” such as fish kills in the Great Lakes, lethal outbreaks of respiratory disease in African apes, bald eagle die-offs in Wisconsin, and diseases

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

from Dr. Kahn. 1 Moreover, Dr. Kahn's visionary 2006 article titled “Confronting zoonoses, linking human and veterinary medicine” 2 published in the CDC's prestigious Journal of Emerging Infectious Diseases should be a similar epiphany for her

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association