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–sized implant (1.5-mm drill bit/2.0-mm bone plate) was found unsuitable. Because of this, a 1.5-mm hole was elected for this study, with the assumption that controlling axial force, displacement, and lateral “wobble” will decrease the damage caused by drilling

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

amount of heat generated during drilling of the transcortical holes required for transfixation pin placement in adult equine cortical bones, it has been recommended to use sequentially larger drill bits for creation of a 6.2-mm-diameter hole. 10,14 In

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

. Pin tract drilling For each bone, the periosteum was cleared over each marked pin tract position, and then a pilot hole was drilled by hand with a 3.2-mm drill bit a and electric drill b centered over each of the 3 positions. Drilling was performed

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

the body of the sacrum using a 2.5 mm cannulated drill bit placed over the implanted Kirschner wire. After the drill bit and Kirschner wire were removed, a final fluoroscopic image was obtained. Figure 2 (A) Fluoroscopic image of freehand

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Summary

Between January 1985 and May 1989, 53 Thoroughbred horses (mean age 3.2 years) were surgically treated for dorsal cortical fractures of the third metacarpal bone (mc III). All horses were treated with cortical drilling through the fracture line (osteostixis). Diagnosis of the fractures was confirmed by xeroradiography. Lifetime racing records were obtained for all horses.

Forty-seven horses returned to racing after surgery (89%). The mean time between surgery and the first race was 6.8 months. Horses had a mean of 10.9 starts before surgery and 16.1 starts after surgery. The mean earnings per start before surgery was $6,459 and after surgery was $5,685. Of the 47 horses that raced after surgery, 70% raced at the same class or improved.

Complications related to surgery were seen in 10 horses. Two horses had a second fracture of mc 111 at the same site, and were again treated by osteostixis, after which both horses returned to competition. Fractured drill bits were left in the mc 111 of 4 horses. One of these horses had catastrophic failure of mc III. Two horses developed subcutaneous infections and 2 horses had catastrophic failure of mc 111 in the surgically treated limb. Osteostixis appears to be an effective treatment for returning horses affected with dorsal cortical fractures to racing.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Medical records were reviewed for 12 cattle with septic arthritis of the distal interphalangeal joint that were treated by use of facilitated ankylosis. Information on signalment, clinical signs, digit affected, radiographic findings, and type and duration of treatment were compiled. Owners were contacted for information about the convalescent period, reasons for culling, productivity, and outcome. Outcome was classified as successful or unsuccessful on the basis of lameness, growth pattern, and whether the cattle were subsequently productive. Cause of the septic arthritis was unknown in 9 of 12 (75%) cattle. Eleven of 12 (92%) cattle represented beef breeds. Cattle were lame for a mean of 5.3 weeks before admission. In 8 of 12 (67%) cattle, a trephine was used in the creation of an arthrostomy, the middle and distal phalanges were curetted, and the joint was lavaged with isotonic solution. A drill bit was used in 4 of 12 (33%) cattle to remove articular cartilage and facilitate ankylosis.

Convalescent period after discharge from the hospital was 1 to 7 months (mean, 4 months; median, 4 months). After that period, all cattle had an apparently normal gait. Eight of 12 (67%) cattle were maintained in their herd of origin. None of the cattle were culled because of lameness. Two of 12 (17%) cattle had a deformation of the affected digit. According to the criteria for successful outcome that were used in the study reported here, the success rate was 100%. Treatment of septic arthritis of the distal interphalangeal joint by use of facilitated ankylosis is an alternative to digit amputation and is recommended to promote longevity and productivity.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

effective diameter of 4.5 mm and were 40.0 mm in length ( Figure 1 ). The microlathe was reprogrammed with the dimensions of a 3.5-mm-diameter drill bit, and bone pins (3.5 × 36.0 mm) were created. The bone screws were stored frozen at −80°C and soaked in

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

commonly for transfixation pin casts in adult horses are cylindrical 6.3-mm-shaft 8.0-mm-thread-diameter positive-profile threaded stainless steel pins. Hole preparation is completed with a cylindrical 6.2-mm-diameter stainless steel drill bit, which

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

parallel to the articular surface. A 14.5-cmlong cylindrical drill bit c was used to drill a pilot hole (3.2 mm in diameter) through the fracture fragment and parent epiphyseal bone in a lateral to medial direction (completely exiting the medial condyle

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

rim. The images depict placement of the wire across the glenoid cavity (performed with a wire driver) and its subsequent overdrilling with a cannulated drill bit (performed at a later stage). D and E—A second guidewire is inserted into the joint from

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association