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in clinically normal control dogs. 16 These data suggest that mitochondrial abnormalities play a role in heart disease of dogs, similar to the role in heart disease of humans. Dilated cardiomyopathy is a primary myocardial disease characterized by

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Dilated cardiomyopathy is a familial disease in Doberman Pinschers and is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. 1–3 Onset of DCM is in adulthood, and affected dogs may have myocardial dysfunction, tachyarrhythmias, and congestive heart

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Dilated cardiomyopathy, characterized by impaired myocardial systolic function and ventricular chamber dilatation (ie, volume overload hypertrophy), is one of the most common heart diseases in large- and giant-breed dogs. 1 The etiology of DCM in

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Dilated cardiomyopathy is the most common myocardial disease in dogs and is characterized by reduced contractility (systolic dysfunction) and eccentric hypertrophy (dilation) of the left or both ventricles. It is responsible for a considerable

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Introduction Primary dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is thought to have a genetic cause and is seen most commonly in large- and giant-breed dogs, such as Doberman Pinschers, Boxers, Great Danes, and Irish Wolfhounds. 1 – 6 Pit bull breeds

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

studies of mitochondria, as this organelle has been shown to be altered by fluctuating protein turnover and release 10 as well as by transport of proteins into mitochondria from the cytosol. Dilated cardiomyopathy is a myocardial disease characterized

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Dilated cardiomyopathy is a familial, adult-onset disease in Doberman Pinschers that is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait, at least in some families of dogs. 1 A genetic variant associated with DCM has been identified in both the PDK4

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Dilated cardiomyopathy is a primary myocardial disease and the second most common, nonparasitic acquired heart disease (after chronic valvular disease) in dogs. The disease is inherited in several breeds, 1–5 although potential causative

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

subunits. Hence, there may be subcellular differences between experimentally induced and naturally occurring forms of canine DCM. ABBREVIATIONS DCM Dilated cardiomyopathy NADH Reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide ETC

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Summary

Between October 1986 and September 1988, 37 cats with moderate to severe idiopathic myocardial failure (dilated cardiomyopathy) were evaluated. Clinical management of these cats was similar to that described in the literature, except that it also included administration of 500 or 1,000 mg of the sulfur amino acid, taurine per day.

Early death (death within the first 30 days of treatment) occurred in 14 (38%) cats. One cat was lost to follow-up evaluation. Twenty-two cats (59%) had marked clinical and echocardiographic improvement and survived longer than 240 days. In all but 1 cat, the observed improvement in echocardiographic measurements persisted. Hypothermia and thromboembolism were positively associated with an increased risk of early death. Administration of digoxin did not significantly affect survival.

All 22 cats that survived > 30 days remained clinically stable despite withdrawal of all medications except taurine. Administration of taurine was eventually discontinued in 20 of the 22 cats and adequate taurine intake was thereafter provided for in the food.

The clinical response and 1-year survival rate of 58% (21 of 36 cats with a known outcome) in the taurine-treated group represents a marked improvement, compared with a 1-year survival rate of 13% (4 of 31 cats with a known outcome) in a retrospectively evaluated population of 33 cats with dilated cardiomyopathy.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association