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Diabetes mellitus occurs commonly in dogs and is controlled with daily insulin administration. 1 Insulin types commonly used for treatment of diabetes mellitus in dogs include porcine insulin zinc suspension, 2 recombinant human NPH insulin, 3

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Renal transplantation is an established treatment for end-stage renal disease in cats. 1 Cats that have decompensated renal disease and are free from systemic disease, such as neoplasia and diabetes mellitus, are considered to be candidates for

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
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formulated for syringe feeding to carnivorous animals. The ferret grazed on food and slept intermittently during the assessment. Figure 1— Blood glucose concentrations monitored on 3 occasions in a ferret with diabetes mellitus that was receiving

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Introduction Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common endocrinopathies affecting dogs. It is estimated that 1 in 100 dogs to 1 in 500 dogs will develop DM. 1 Diabetes mellitus–associated ocular changes such as cataracts, decreased corneal

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

other without a distinct nadir. Glargine insulin is therefore described as a peakless insulin and is used in human patients with diabetes mellitus to mimic the flat interprandial second phase of normal insulin secretion. 1,3 The use of glargine insulin

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Diabetes mellitus is one of the most commonly encountered endocrine diseases in cats, with a prevalence of 1 in 230 in an insured population. 1 Predisposing factors, such as male sex, obesity, indoor confinement, and physical inactivity

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

In dogs with metabolically unstable diabetes mellitus, production of ketone bodies exceeds utilization of them for energy, resulting in an increase in serum ketone concentration. Most diabetic dogs have serum ketone concentrations that are higher

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Obesity is prevalent among the domestic feline population 1 and is associated with a 4-fold risk of developing diabetes mellitus. 2 Obesity likely plays a primary role in insulin resistance in cats, and glucose intolerance with impaired insulin

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

, combined with persistent hyperglycemia, were strongly suggestive of pancreatitis with hepatobiliary involvement and secondary diabetes mellitus. Differential etiologies for underlying or concurrent problems included pancreatic, hepatic, biliary, or

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Measurement of blood glucose concentration and generation of BGCs are commonly used during long-term management of cats with diabetes mellitus. 1 Until recently, BGCs were almost always generated in a veterinary hospital because many cat owners

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association