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keeping management were similar in Northwest, West, and South Iceland. A total of 30.6% of the horses (52/170) had received regular dental treatment in the past. A total of 92.3% (48/52) of them were checked once a year. In 2 cases, “regular” meant 1

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

-healthy animals, received annual dental treatment. Whereas EOTRH-healthy horses are presented to a veterinarian/dentist for dental treatment irregularly (52.2%), only 1.9% of EOTRH-affected horses received dental treatment infrequently. Detailed

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

treatment duration. We consider a veterinary anesthetist in Canada caring for small animal patients undergoing dental treatment. The veterinary anesthetist both directly cares for some patients and supervises veterinary technicians. Consequently, the

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective

To determine the diagnostic value of full-mouth radiography in cats.

Sample Population

115 cats referred for dental treatment without a previous full-mouth radiographic series available.

Procedure

In a prospective nested case-control analysis of multiple outcomes in a hospital cohort of cats referred for dental treatment, full-mouth radiography was done prior to oral examination and charting. After treatment, the clinical and radiographic findings were compared, with reference to presenting problems, main clinical findings, additional information obtained from radiography and unexpected radiographic findings. Importance of the radiographic findings in therapeutic decision making was assessed.

Results

The main clinical findings were radiographically confirmed in all cats. Odontoclastic resorption lesions, missed on clinical examination, were diagnosed in 8.7% of cats. Analysis of selected presenting problems and main clinical findings yielded significantly increased odds ratios for a variety of other conditions, either expected or unexpected. Radiographs of teeth without clinical lesions yielded incidental or clinically important findings in 4.8 and 41.7% of cats, respectively, and were considered of no clinical value in 53.6%. Radiographs of teeth with clinical lesions merely confirmed the findings in 13.9% of cats, but yielded additional or clinically essential information in 53.9 and 32.2%, respectively.

Clinical Relevance

The diagnostic yield of full-mouth radiography in new feline patients referred for dental treatment is high, and routine use of full-mouth radiography is justifiable. (Am J Vet Res 1998;59:692-695)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

periodontitis) being the most common abnormality reported to occur in companion animals. 1 , 2 Dental treatment has increased in range and sophistication. 3 – 5 The value of full-mouth intraoral radiographs has been well documented. 6 – 10 The AVMA

Open access

Abstract

Objective

To determine the diagnostic value of full-mouth radiography in dogs.

Sample Population

Prospective series of 226 dogs referred for dental treatment without previous full-mouth radiographic views being available.

Procedure

In a prospective nested case-control analysis of multiple outcomes in a hospital cohort of dogs presented for dental treatment, full-mouth radiographic views were obtained prior to oral examination and charting. After treatment, clinical and radiographic findings were compared, with reference to presenting problems, main clinical findings, additional information obtained from the radiographs, and unexpected radiographic findings. The importance of the radiographic findings in therapeutic decision-making was assessed.

Results

The main clinical findings were radiographically confirmed in all dogs. Selected presenting problems and main clinical findings yielded significantly increased odds ratios for a variety of other conditions, either expected or unexpected. Radiographs of teeth without clinical lesions yielded incidental or clinically important findings in 41.7 and 27.8% of dogs, respectively, and were considered of no clinical value in 30.5%. Radiographs of teeth with clinical lesions merely confirmed the findings in 24.3% of dogs, yielded additional or clinically essential information in 50.0 and 22.6%, respectively, and were considered of no value in 3.1%. Older dogs derived more benefit from full-mouth radiography than did younger dogs. Incidental findings were more common in larger dogs.

Clinical Relevance

Diagnostic yield of full-mouth radiography in new canine patients referred for dental treatment is high, and the routine use of such radiographs is justifiable. (Am J Vet Res 1998;59:686-691)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine elemental composition of teeth with and without odontoclastic resorption lesions (ORL) in cats.

Sample Population—Normal teeth from 22 cadaver cats and ORL-affected teeth from 21 cats admitted to the veterinary hospital for dental treatment.

Procedure—An electron microprobe was used to analyze weight percentages of calcium, phosphorus, fluorine, sodium, magnesium, sulfur, potassium, and iron in enamel, dentin, and cementum.

Results—Calcium and phosphorus were the most abundant elements. Fluorine, sodium, and magnesium combined were < 5% and sulfur, potassium, and iron combined were < 0.1% of total elemental composition. In enamel of normal teeth, a significant sex-by-jaw location interaction was seen in mean (± SD) phosphorus content, which was higher in mandibular teeth of females (17.64 ± 0.41%) but lower in mandibular teeth of males (16.71 ± 0.83%). Mean iron content in dentin of normal teeth was significantly lower in mandibular teeth than maxillary teeth (0.014 ± 0.005% vs 0.023 ± 0.019%). Mean enamel sodium content was significantly higher (0.77 ± 0.046% vs 0.74 ± 0.025) and mean enamel iron content was significantly lower (0.017 ± 0.008% vs 0.021 ± 0.005%) in ORL-affected teeth, compared with normal teeth. In cementum, mean fluorine content was significantly lower (2.98% ± 0.27 vs 2.99 ± 0.20%) and mean magnesium content was significantly lower (0.54 ± 0.13% vs 0.60 ± 0.13%) in ORLaffected teeth, compared with normal teeth.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results of our study establish baseline mineral content of enamel, dentin, and cementum for normal teeth in cats. Minimal differences in mineral content of enamel and cementum of normal and ORL-affected teeth were detected. (Am J Vet Res 2002;63:546–550)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

dog of this report had undergone dental treatment for a complicated crown-root fracture of the right maxillary fourth premolar tooth, also attributed to chewing a cow bone, 6 months prior to evaluation for a fractured incisor tooth. Client compliance

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

the distal portion of the right and left mandible, respectively, at 2.5 years of age. Two years later, the dog presented for a dental treatment of mild periodontitis. Aside from grade 1 periodontitis and unerupted left mandibular first premolar

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

a comprehensive diagnostic plan in patients undergoing dental treatment, as has been described. 3 The historical, clinicopathologic, and clinical data collected prior to a seemingly routine periodontal treatment failed to reveal a potentially life

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association