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T he cranial cruciate ligament (CrCL) plays a vital role in providing stability in the stifle joint. 1 The CrCL prevents hyperextension of the stifle, reduces excessive internal rotation, and prevents cranial tibial translation. 2 – 4 The

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Osmond and Tudury, and between Miles and Tudury using t test. No significant differences were found between Osmond and Miles ( Table 3 ) . Table 1 Characteristics of the canine population with cranial cruciate ligament (CrCL) rupture

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

RCCL for breeding. CCL Cranial cruciate ligament RCCL Rupture of the CCL ISU-CVM Iowa State University College of Veterinary Medicine MRI Magnetic resonance imaging a PROC INBREED, SAS, version 8.2, SAS Institute

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

inflammatory arthritis. 1,2 A prCCL has been described as a common clinical finding in dogs with CCLD. Biomechanically a partially ruptured cranial cruciate ligament is defined by a disruption of the CCL in a stable stifle joint. Older reports indicate that 8

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

regulation of CCL development prior to sexual maturity or cessation of physical development. ABBREVIATIONS AR Androgen receptor CCL Cranial cruciate ligament DHT Dihydrotestosterone E 2 17β-estradiol ESR1 Estrogen receptor α MMP Matrix

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Cranial cruciate ligament disease, which is clinically characterized by partial or complete rCCL, is a daunting orthopedic problem, with an estimated annual economic burden exceeding $1.3 billion for US pet owners. 1 Despite medical and surgical

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Americans spend > $1.32 billion/y on treatment of dogs for cranial cruciate ligament disease 1 ; surgical treatment accounts for 90% of that cost. 1 Although surgical treatment improves outcomes for large- and giant-breed dogs with cranial

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

whether LPS affects outcome following stifle joint stabilization. ABBREVIATIONS CCL Cranial cruciate ligament LPS Lymphoplasmacytic synovitis a. SigmaStat, version 3.0, SPSS Inc, Chicago, Ill. References 1. Doom M de Bruin

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

cranial cruciate ligament in dogs. If so, then one would expect that a high TPA would increase the strain on the cranial cruciate ligament, which would, in turn, increase the risk of CCLD, defined as partial or complete rupture of the cranial cruciate

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Cranial cruciate ligament rupture is considered a common cause of hind limb lameness in dogs. In a study 1 of Newfoundland dogs that were evaluated at a veterinary teaching institution in a 6-year period, 36 of 163 (22.1%) had CCLR. The economic

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research