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in the horse and how we might apply what we have learned from the horse to other veterinary species and humans. SDFT Core Lesions in Horses While there are several types of SDFT injuries that can occur in horses, by far the most common type is

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

median anesthesia time was 110 minutes (range, 80 to 135 minutes) when both imaging procedures were performed. For the 56 limbs imaged by CT in 28 horses, DDF tendinopathy was found in 48. Core lesions were present in 46 of 48 (96%) affected limbs, and

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

revealed a large, centrally located core lesion beginning at the middle portion of the metacarpus in the deep digital flexor tendon ( Figure 1 ). As the deep digital flexor tendon was followed distally, the core lesion became larger and extended laterally

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

commonly located in the center of the tendon within the mid-metacarpal region 5,6 (generating a classic core lesion appearance in ultrasonographic images). It has been postulated that core lesions account for most of the tendon injuries in racehorses

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

horses admitted to the Marion duPont Scott Equine Medical Center between January 1995 and December 2004 because of proximal suspensory desmitis were reviewed. Horses were included in the study only if a core lesion was identified ultrasonographically in

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

cartilaginous core lesions are described radiographically as a bilateral triangular, well-defined, and smoothly marginated radiolucent area within the distal ulnar metaphysis, sometimes surrounded by a thin rim of osteosclerosis adjacent to this radiolucency. 1

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

, and at the level of the pastern—as single lesions or in multiple combinations. 1–3 Deep digital flexor tendon lesions have been described as dorsal border fibrillation, core lesions, or sagittal splits. 1–6 These different lesion types can also occur

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

SDFT. 11,15,16,18–23 Use of the surgical arthroscopic burr technique has the advantage of the creation of large, well-defined core lesions; however, it requires that horses be anesthetized and, depending on the surgical approach, the paratenon 11

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

effects of ADNC injection were compared with results for vehicle-injected control tendons. The hypothesis was that intralesional injection of ADNC fractions would improve healing of tendon core lesions through an increase in cell numbers, reduction of

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

aspect of the tendon, and no central core lesions were detected. Of 17 horses for which follow-up information was available, 3 had a recurrence and 1 developed a lesion in the contralateral forelimb. Overall, however, 16 of the 17 horses returned to their

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association