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, Kostomitsopoulos N . Valuation of three different anaesthetic protocols on complete blood count and biochemical parameters on Wistar rats . J Hellen Vet Med Soc . 2017 ; 68 ( 4 ): 587 – 598 . doi: 10.12681/jhvms.16057 10. Berg K , Whittington J

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

observed, 2 of the common diagnostic tests chosen to evaluate the animal are a complete blood count (CBC) and a serum biochemistry profile. 1 According to Latimer et al (2011), hematological reference intervals differ for horses in tropical compared to

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To compare results of a CBC performed on blood samples obtained from healthy dogs and cats by use of standard and microsample collection tubes.

Design—Evaluation study.

Animals—29 healthy client-owned animals (14 dogs and 15 cats).

Procedures—A blood sample (3 mL) was collected from each animal; 2.5 mL was transferred into a vacuum tube that contained sodium EDTA, and 0.5 mL was transferred into a microsample tube that contained sodium EDTA. Variables evaluated were total numbers of RBCs and WBCs, hemoglobin concentration, Hct, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC), mean platelet volume, and plasma total protein concentration as well as neutrophil, lymphocyte, monocyte, eosinophil, basophil, and platelet counts. Results for the 2 types of tube in each species were compared by use of Pearson correlation coefficients, Passing-Bablok regression analysis, and Bland-Altman analysis.

Results—The Pearson correlation coefficient was low for basophil count in cats and moderate, high, or very high for all other variables. Constant and proportional biases were identified for MCHC in dogs by use of Passing-Bablok regression analysis, although the mean difference between types of blood collection tubes was small. No evidence of constant or proportional bias for any other variable was revealed by regression analysis or Bland-Altman analysis.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Samples obtained from healthy dogs and cats by use of microsample blood collection tubes provided clinically equivalent CBC results, compared with results for samples obtained by use of standard blood collection tubes, and minimized the total sample volume collected for diagnostic testing.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

thoracic radiography. Complete blood count revealed moderate erythrocytosis (Hct, 65.3% [reference range, 33% to 55%]) and moderate lymphopenia (lymphocyte count, 0.36 × 10 3 cells/mL [reference range, 1.0 to 5.0 × 10 3 cells/mL]). Serum biochemical

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

male dolphin with a 4-cm, warm, erythematous swelling (black circle) over the pre-anal gland region. Follow-up blood collection and ultrasound of the pre-anal gland were performed. Complete blood count revealed a persistent, static leukocytosis

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

pain. Complete blood count revealed neutrophilic leukocytosis (WBC count, 25.08 × 10 3 cells/μL [reference range, 5.50 × 10 3 cells/μL to 16.90 × 10 3 cells/μL]; neutrophil count, 19.92 × 10 3 cells/μL [reference range, 2.0 × 10 3 cells/μL to 12

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether dogs given garlic extract developed hemolytic anemia and to establish the hematologic characteristics induced experimentally by intragastric administration of garlic extract.

Animals—8 healthy adult mixed-breed dogs.

Procedure—4 dogs were given 1.25 ml of garlic extract/kg of body weight (5 g of whole garlic/kg) intragastrically once a day for 7 days. The remaining 4 contol dogs received water instead of garlic extract. Complete blood counts were performed, and methemoglobin and erythrocyte-reduced glutathione concentrations, percentage of erythrocytes with Heinz bodies, and percentage of eccentrocytes were determined before and for 30 days after administration of the first dose of garlic extract. Ultrastructural analysis of eccentrocytes was performed.

Results—Compared with initial values, erythrocyte count, Hct, and hemoglobin concentration decreased to a minimum value on days 9 to 11 in dogs given garlic extract. Heinz body formation, an increase in erythrocyte- reduced glutathione concentration, and eccentrocytes were also detected in these dogs. However, no dog developed hemolytic anemia.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The constituents of garlic have the potential to oxidize erythrocyte membranes and hemoglobin, inducing hemolysis associated with the appearance of eccentrocytes in dogs. Thus, foods containing garlic should not be fed to dogs. Eccentrocytosis appears to be a major diagnostic feature of garlic-induced hemolysis in dogs. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61:1446–1450)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Case Description—A 6-year-old neutered male cat was examined because of a 4-week history of abnormal sounds while drinking and a previously noted mass at the base of the tongue.

Clinical Findings—Oral examination revealed a 1-cm-diameter midline cystic mass on the dorsal aspect of the base of the tongue at the junction of the rostral two-thirds and caudal third of the tongue. Complete blood count and serum biochemical analysis revealed no clinically relevant abnormalities, and serum total thyroxine and free thyroxine (determined by equilibrium dialysis) concentrations were within the reference range.

Treatment and Outcome—The fluid in the cystic mass was aspirated, and the remaining deflated mass was marsupialized. Histologic and immunohistochemical examination of sections of the excised mass revealed ectopic thyroid tissue. The cat recovered uneventfully from the surgery, clinical signs resolved, and the cat remained euthyroid with no recurrence of the mass as of 8 months after surgery.

Clinical Relevance—This is the first known reported case of ectopic lingual thyroid tissue in a male cat. In humans, the most common site of ectopic thyroid tissue is at the base of the tongue and the condition is disproportionately found in females, compared with males. In humans with ectopic lingual thyroid tissue, the patient often lacks any other functional thyroid tissue. However, the cat of this report remained euthyroid after mass resection.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

CASE DESCRIPTION

A 14-year-old 120-kg (264-lb) sexually intact male Sumatran tiger (Panthera tigris sumatrae) and its 10-year-old 130-kg (286-lb) sexually intact male offspring were housed separately and evaluated independently after experiencing weeks of ongoing malaise, weight loss, and anorexia.

CLINICAL FINDINGS

Both animals were immobilized and anesthetized for physical examinations and diagnostic testing. Complete blood counts revealed leukopenia and anemia in both tigers. Splenomegaly was identified on abdominal ultrasonography. Cytologic examination and immunohistochemical staining of splenic samples confirmed intermediate to large B-cell lymphoma; no evidence of lymphoma in surrounding organs was noted.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME

The sire was treated with lomustine and prednisolone. This tiger was euthanized 21 months after initiation of treatment because of chronic progressive renal disease. The male offspring was treated with l-asparaginase but did not respond to the treatment. A splenectomy was performed, and malaise and anorexia resolved. No further chemotherapy was administered, and the male offspring was instead maintained on a low dose of prednisolone. Thirty-two months after diagnosis, the male offspring was still considered to be in remission.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

To our knowledge, this was the first known report of the diagnosis and management of a splenic B-cell lymphoma in a tiger. Both tigers achieved positive clinical responses and long-term survival by means of different treatment modalities. The finding of such an unusual neoplasm in a male tiger and its male offspring was noteworthy, raising the possibility of a genetic predisposition for this lymphoma type.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine the effects of SC administration of filgrastim on cell counts in venous blood and bone marrow of healthy adult alpacas.

Animals—10 healthy alpacas.

Procedures—Alpacas were randomly assigned to receive treatment with filgrastim (5 μg/ kg, SC; n = 5) or an equivalent volume of physiologic saline (0.9% NaCl) solution (5) once a day for 3 days. Blood samples were obtained via jugular venipuncture 1 day prior to treatment and once a day for 5 days commencing 24 hours after the first dose was administered. Complete blood counts were performed for each blood sample. Bone marrow aspirates were obtained from the sternum of each alpaca 48 hours before the first treatment was administered and 72 hours after the third treatment was administered. Myeloid-to-erythroid cell (M:E) ratio was determined via cytologic evaluation of bone marrow aspirates.

Results—In filgrastim-treated alpacas, substantial increases in counts of WBCs and neutrophils were detected within 24 hours after the first dose was administered. Band cell count and percentage significantly increased 24 hours after the second dose. Counts of WBCs, neutrophils, and band cells remained high 48 hours after the third dose. Red blood cell counts and PCV were unaffected. The M:E ratio also increased significantly after treatment with filgrastim.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Filgrastim induced rapid and substantial increases in numbers of circulating neutrophils and M:E ratios of bone marrow in healthy alpacas. Therefore, filgrastim may be useful in the treatment of camelids with impaired bone marrow function.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research