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that miniature horses and ponies, young horses (≤ 1 year old), and aged equids (> 20 years old) would be predisposed to fecalith obstruction compared to a general colic population. A secondary hypothesis was that survival following surgery for fecalith

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

The association between various management factors and development of colic was studied in 821 horses treated for colic and 821 control horses treated for noncolic emergencies by practicing veterinarians in Texas between Oct 1, 1991 and Dec 31, 1992. History of previous colic and history of previous abdominal surgery were found to be significantly associated with colic. Change in stabling conditions during the 2 weeks prior to the time of examination, recent change in diet, and recent change in level of activity significantly increased the risk for development of colic. Changes in activity level, diet, and stabling conditions were identified as potentially alterable risk factors for colic. Logistic regression was used to adjust for the effects of all variables found to be significantly associated with colic by means of univariate analysis, and only history of previous colic, history of previous abdominal surgery, and history of recent change in diet remained significantly associated with colic. Results of this study indicate that a proportion of colic cases might be prevented by minimizing changes in management practices.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Postoperative colic is commonly recognized after abdominal surgery in horses, 1–3 and more recently, the incidence of colic following nonabdominal surgeries and general anesthesia without surgery has been reported. 4–9 The authors are unaware of

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Colic is a common problem of equine neonates. 1,2 It is generally accepted that most neonates referred to a hospital for colic can be managed medically 2 ; however, this has not been documented in foals < 30 days old. In neonates, the most common

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

History A 4-year-old 634-kg Friesian mare was referred to The Ohio State University for acute colic-like behavior. Prior to presentation, the mare acutely collapsed while being lunged as part of a routine exercise program and began

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

History A 3-year-old Thoroughbred filly presented for evaluation of severe colic that was refractory to medical treatment at the racetrack. The filly had raced in the afternoon, cooled out normally, and had upper airway endoscopy performed

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the reliability of a method for inducing colic via small intestinal distention in horses and to examine the analgesic potential of bilateral electroacupuncture (EAP) at the Guan-yuan-shu (similar to BL-21) acupoint.

Animals—5 healthy adult horses, each with a gastric cannula.

Procedure—A polyester balloon connected to an electronic barostat was introduced into the duodenum via the gastric cannula. At 2 specified intervals (before and after commencement of EAP), the balloon was inflated to a barostat-controlled pressure that induced signs of moderate colic. Each inflation was maintained for 10 minutes. Heart and respiratory rates were continuously recorded. Frequency of various clinical signs of colic was recorded by 2 trained observers during various combinations of balloon inflation and EAP. Each horse received each of 5 treatment protocols (EAP at 20 Hz, sham EAP at 20 Hz, EAP at 80 : 120 Hz dense:disperse, sham EAP at 80 : 120 Hz dense:disperse, no treatment). Sham EAP was at a point located 2 cm lateral to the Guan-yuan-shu acupoint.

Results—Duodenal distention consistently induced a significant increase in frequency of signs of colic. None of the EAP protocols caused a significant reduction in frequency of these clinical signs during distention.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The method described is reproducible and highly controllable method for inducing colic that involved duodenal distention that should be useful in evaluating the efficacy of various analgesic strategies. Bilateral EAP at the Guan-yuan-shu acupoint was ineffective in reducing signs of discomfort induced by this method. (Am J Vet Res 2002;63:1006–1011)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

associated with primary myocardial injury. 4 Horses with acute colic often have endotoxemia, particularly those with strangulating gastrointestinal lesions or enterocolitis. 5,6 Such horses may be more likely to develop cardiovascular complications

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Colic is a major cause of disease and death in equids. The prevalence of colic in nonhospitalized equid populations during a 1-year period ranges from 3.5% to 10.6%. 1,2 Previously identified risk factors for colic include age, breed, sex

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

postoperative abdominal adhesion formation in foals versus adult horses. We hypothesized that if foals with colic had an inherent propensity to form postoperative adhesions, a relative imbalance would be detected in ≥ 1 of these hemostatic analytes in foals

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research