Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 45 items for :

  • "chronic pancreatitis" x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All

complication of pancreatitis in humans and cats. 9,10 Discussion The gross and histopathologic findings confirmed the antemortem diagnosis of primary chronic pancreatitis leading to secondary diabetes mellitus and intermittent cholestasis. To our

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

investigation of dogs with early (subclinical) PAA identified lymphocytic pancreatitis and circulating autoantibodies against pancreatic acinar cells, suggesting an immune-mediated component to the disease. 22 Chronic pancreatitis is reported to be the most

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

that can often be diagnosed ultrasonographically because the pancreas is enlarged, hypoechoic, and frequently surrounded by hyperechoic peripancreatic fat. 2 However, in chronic pancreatitis, morphological and consequently ultrasonographic changes may

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

, the most common clinical sign associated with pancreatic cysts, pseudocysts, and abscesses is vomiting, with or without anorexia; and pancreatic cysts, pseudocysts, and abscesses are often associated with acute or chronic pancreatitis and diabetes

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Introduction Feline acute and acute on chronic pancreatitis are common conditions resulting in reduced quality of life with the potential for the development of distant organ damage. In 2007, histopathologic evaluation of 115 cats presented

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

have been reported in humans, cattle, and cats and have been experimentally induced in dogs. 1–4 In humans, pancreatoliths are associated with chronic pancreatitis, and the etiology is not completely understood. 1,2,5 In dogs, cattle, and humans, the

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

manifestation in dogs, recent results 15 would suggest that chronic pancreatitis may be more common in dogs than is acute pancreatitis. Little is known about whether chronic pancreatitis is caused by recurrent bouts of acute pancreatitis or whether this

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

a low trypsin-like immunoreactivity concentration at the time of evaluation at the Angell Animal Medical Center. Presumably, in the present case, pancreatic atrophy and insufficiency were secondary to chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic duct stone

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

pancreatitis, chronic pancreatitis, or normal pancreas were available and compared with the results of ultrasonography. Results from histologic evaluation were included only if the time interval between histologic evaluation and determination of both lipase

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association