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L ocal tumor control with wide margins might not always be feasible due to biological behavior, tumor size, or location, 1 and local adjunct chemotherapy might be an additional avenue to consider. Chemotherapy as a local treatment for gross

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

definitive treatment (eg, limb amputation) and can be extended to a range of 8 to 11 months with the addition of adjuvant systemic chemotherapy. 1–8 To improve the poor prognosis associated with osteosarcoma, investigation into novel treatments is needed

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Chemotherapy has been associated with long survival times in dogs with multicentric lymphoma. 1–6 However, treatment is generally only palliative, rather than curative, and relapse is common. 2,4 In dogs in which the disease relapses, changes in

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

management of metastatic disease. Several studies 6–8,10,12–17 have reported that survival times for dogs receiving doxorubicin-based chemotherapy appear to be longer than historical survival times reported for patients treated with surgery alone. Epirubicin

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

With improvements in healthcare, pet dogs can be expected to live longer and veterinarians can be expected to evaluate and treat more elderly dogs than in the past. The role of chemotherapy in extending survival time and maximizing quality of life

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Introduction Chemotherapy is widely used to treat pet dogs and cats with cancer. It is generally considered to be safe and tolerable for most pets. Anecdotal reports suggest that < 25% of pets experience chemotherapy-related adverse events

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Introduction Appendicular osteosarcoma is an aggressive malignancy with a guarded prognosis in dogs. Although the range of therapeutic options continues to expand, limb amputation or limb sparing followed by systemic chemotherapy remains the

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

eligible for inclusion in the study. Dogs with relapsed lymphoma were included only if they had received induction treatment with a multidrug chemotherapy protocol that included doxorubicin; dogs with refractory lymphoma were included only if they had not

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

. Mechanisms that are involved in the development of anemia in humans with cancer include the syndrome of anemia of chronic disease, blood loss, bone marrow invasion by tumor cells, bone marrow suppression as a result of chemotherapy or radiation therapy

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

treatments that offer the potential for prolonged survival time. In canine cancer patients that are treated with chemotherapy, associated transient adverse effects might be considered a reasonable trade-off for increased survival duration. Thus, an important

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association