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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

diagnostic tools are needed. Cell-free DNA is extracellular DNA released during cellular apoptosis or necrosis secondary to normal cell turnover or a variety of disease processes, and plasma cfDNA has been measured in human and veterinary patients. 4–16 A

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

. Andrew Miller uses RNAseq to examine the tumor transcriptome of canine glioma and meningioma and studies the RNA transcriptome of canine soft tissue sarcomas. Using cell-free DNA sequencing, Dr. Jessica Hayward and Dr. Kelly Hume hope to develop better

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

directly related to the detection rate for that cancer type, as described in the CANDiD study. 12 Finally, significant trauma, including tissue damage secondary to surgical procedures, can result in the temporary release of high amounts of cell-free DNA

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

immunohistochemical predictors of metastatic risk have also been identified in the previously referenced studies. 5 , 6 In spite of these studies, there are no reports of cell-free DNA markers that can be used to determine whether a pigmented iris lesion is benign or

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

supernatant is usually discarded. 8 However, cell-free DNA has been detected in human plasma and urine. 9,10 Cell death results in the release of naked DNA. A portion of DNA from dying cells escapes intracellular degradation and phagocytosis and circulates

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

first treated with propidium monoazide, which removes cell-free DNA so that cell-associated DNA is available for amplification. 55 Use of this approach suggested that L interrogans serovar Copenhageni might survive at least 16 days in soil and 28 days

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

proposed test depends on detecting elevated concentrations of nucleosomes, cell-free DNA fragments that circulate in blood. Dr. Heather Wilson-Robles, who is leading the research at Texas A&M, said the amount of nucleosomes in blood rise with inflammation

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association