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. However, both the celiotomy and celioscopy groups could also have developed an increase in LDH and CK associated with the IM injection of meloxicam. There were no significant differences in biopsy specimen score between coeliotomy and coelioscopy groups

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

recurring colic are considered the most commonly encountered problems and, if severe or unrelenting, might require a second celiotomy shortly after the first procedure. Little information is available about horses requiring a second abdominal surgery shortly

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

exploratory celiotomy were 72% to 87.2% in 2 recent large retrospective studies 1,2 and were dependent on many factors, including the lesion location and the presence of devitalized intestine. Horse age can be a major factor considered by owners in

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

development of perioperative hypothermia in patients undergoing celiotomy. Radiative and conductive heat losses may occur as veterinary patients often have a high surface area-to-body mass ratio, room-temperature IV fluids are commonly used, and patients may

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

species of sea turtles, but not extensively described in freshwater turtles. These include an intraoral retrograde approach, removal via endoscopy and esophagostomy, and various approaches for celiotomy to retrieve fishhooks from different aspects of the

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Objective

To determine the prevalence of wound infection following celiotomy in horses and to determine risk factors associated with the development of such infections.

Design

Prospective study.

Animals

210 horses that had 235 celiotomies.

Procedure

All horses that had celiotomies between March 1990 and March 1992 were considered for this study. Only horses that survived ≥ 10 days after surgery were included in analysis of risk factors for postoperative wound infection.

Results

Of the 210 horses, 161 (76.7%) were discharged; of the horses discharged, 147 horses had a single celiotomy and 14 had multiple celiotomies. Twenty-six (12.4%) horses were euthanatized during surgery and were, therefore, excluded from further analysis. Twenty-three horses died during the postoperative period. Of these 23 horses, 15 that died within 10 days of surgery also were excluded from further analysis. Thus, 169 horses were included in the analysis of risk factors for developing incisional infection.

Evidence of incisional infection was observed in 43 of 169 (25.4%) horses. Increased concentration of fibrinogen in peritoneal fluid obtained prior to surgery, performing an enterotomy, and use of polyglactin 910 to close the linea alba were all significantly (P ≤ 0.05) associated with increased risk of postoperative wound infection.

Whether incisional herniation developed was recorded for 76 horses. The proportion of horses with hernias among those with postoperative wound infection was 19.1 %, compared with 3.6 % of horses without evidence of postoperative wound infection, indicating a significant association between postoperative wound infection and development of incisional hernias.

Clinical Implications

Increased concentration of fibrinogen in peritoneal fluid prior to surgery, performing an enterotomy, and use of polyglactin 910 to close the linea alba is significantly associated with increased risk for wound infection following celiotomy in horses. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1997;210:78–81)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

surgical wounds of horses managed with 3 types of protective dressings, including a PHMB-impregnated gauze dressing, following exploratory celiotomy with a ventral midline approach for treatment of signs of abdominal pain (ie, colic). We hypothesized that

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

antimicrobial therapy. Various diagnostic tests have been evaluated for use in the diagnosis of septic peritonitis in dogs that have not undergone celiotomy. 6–8 Bacterial culture of abdominal fluid remains the gold standard for diagnosis of septic

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

The effect of right paralumbar fossa exploratory celiotomy and omentopexy on peritoneal fluid constituents was studied in 22 adult dairy cows. Six cows were eliminated on the basis of physical examination findings (n = 2), surgical findings (n = 2), or inability to obtain a sufficient volume of peritoneal fluid (n = 2). Sixteen cattle had normal results of cbc and serum biochemical analysis, and a minimum of 1 ml of peritoneal fluid was obtained by abdominocentesis. Abdominocentesis was repeated on days 1, 2, and 6 after surgery. Statistical analysis for repeated measures was performed, using a significance level of P < 0.05. Stage of gestation was evaluated for interaction with time.

Mean total nucleated cell count was 3,200 cells/μl before surgery, was significantly increased 2 days after surgery (16,336 cells/μl), and continued to increase through day 6 (20,542 cells/μl). Mean polymorphonuclear cell count was 1,312 cells/μl before surgery and was significantly higher at 2 (11,043 cells/μl) and 6 (10,619 cells/μl) days after surgery. Mean lymphocyte count was 254 cells/μl before surgery and was significantly increased 2 days (1,911 cells/μl) after surgery. By day 6, lymphocyte numbers were similar to preoperative values. Mean mononuclear cell count was 770 cells/μl before surgery and was significantly increased on days 1 (3,084 cells/μl), 2 (3,285 cells/μl), and 6 (2,349 cells/μl) after surgery. Mean eosinophil numbers were 1,388 cells/μl before surgery and were significantly increased on day 6 (6,347 cells/μl) only. Interaction between time and stage of gestation was found only for specific gravity and total protein concentration. In general, specific gravity and total protein concentration increased after surgery (mean before surgery, 1.016 and 3.6 g/dl; mean after surgery, 1.021 and 5.6 g/dl). Left paralumbar fossa celiotomy performed 7 days after surgery did not reveal complications of repeated abdominocentesis, and pregnancy status was unchanged.

Peritoneal fluid constituents are highly variable after exploratory celiotomy and omentopexy in cattle. However, results of this study may provide a reference for interpretation of postoperative peritoneal fluid sample findings in cattle.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Objective

To determine the incidence of and risk factors for developing diarrhea in horses after celiotomy for colic.

Design

Retrospective cohort study.

Animals

357 adult horses that had celiotomy for colic at the teaching hospital between Jan 1, 1990 and Sep 1, 1994.

Procedure

Medical records of horses that had celiotomy for colic were reviewed to abstract information regarding development of diarrhea, signalment, history, and treatment.

Results

In horses that had celiotomy for colic, the incidence of diarrhea was 53.2% (190/357). Using multiple logistic regression, horses with a disorder of the large intestine were approximately twice as likely to develop diarrhea after celiotomy as horses that had surgery for other types of intestinal lesions (P < 0.001). Even after accounting for the effects of large intestinal surgery, horses that also had an enterotomy were approximately 1,5 times as likely to develop diarrhea (P = 0.042). Diarrhea in horses associated with duration > 2 days, isolation of Salmonella spp from feces, or leukopenia was categorized as being severe. Incidence of severe diarrhea was 27.5% (98/357). Using multiple logistic regression, horses that had surgery of the large intestine were approximately 2.5 times as likely to develop severe diarrhea after celiotomy as horses that had surgery for other types of intestinal lesions (P = 0.006). In horses that had celiotomy for colic, those that were fed grass hay were approximately half as likely to develop severe diarrhea as were horses that were not fed grass hay (P = 0.018).

Clinical Implications

Although the risk factors identified for the development of diarrhea are not alterable, knowledge of them will enable clinicians to better advise clients and to better prepare for medical management of horses after surgery. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1996;209:810–813)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association