Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 8,801 items for :

  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All

administered safely in conjunction with other treatments. Materials and Methods Case selection criteria Electronic medical records of client-owned dogs treated for a confirmed diagnosis of a mast cell tumor of any grade, stage, or tumor location at

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

. Materials and Methods Case selection criteria Medical records of all dogs that were examined at the University of Florida Small Animal Hospital and underwent elective single-incision laparoscopic gastropexy between June 2012 and August 2013 were

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

incidental adrenal gland masses would be more common in older dogs. Materials and Methods Case selection criteria and medical records review Electronic medical records of dogs that underwent abdominal CT at the University of Florida Veterinary

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

removal necessitating revision surgery would be less frequent in the dogs undergoing LAC. Materials and Methods Selection of cases and controls —Medical records were searched to identify dogs that underwent OC or LAC between September 10, 2009, and

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Objective

To develop a prototype program for surveillance of causes of death of dogs, using resources developed for the World Wide Web, to enable collection of data from veterinarians in small animal practice and dissemination of results in a timely manner at minimal expense.

Design

Epidemiologic survey.

Sample Population

Small animal veterinarians who were members of NOAH, Veterinary Information Network (VIN), or VetPlus-L.

Procedure

Internet electronic communications and Web pages were used for solicitation and collection of data, dissemination of results, and follow-up discussions with participants. Data were stored in a relational database.

Results

25 veterinarians actively submitted case material. On the basis of analysis by region and school of veterinary medicine attended, these veterinarians were representative of all small animal practitioners in the United States. During the 6-month study, 621 case reports were submitted. Analysis of results included determination of number of dogs, with proportions calculated for primary reason for death, primary clinical sign, and breed, as well as creation of a map depicting distribution of the practitioners. Additional data were obtained for analysis to provide information of interest.

Clinical Implications

A national database representative of dogs examined by small animal practitioners would be a valuable source of information. Rapidly and easily accessible return of information and results is important for any surveillance system. The program described here appears to be a successful method for collecting data from practitioners. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1998;213:251-256)

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

a technical challenge in some cases because the most common reason for total splenectomy is removal of splenic masses. 1,2 Intracorporeal manipulation of a spleen containing a mass lesion during LS must be undertaken with caution and may result in

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

for SPLC in dogs and cats and report short-term clinical outcome for dogs and cats that underwent the procedure. Materials and Methods Case selection —Medical records of client-owned sexually intact dogs and cats that underwent SPLC between April

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

the normal host. Most parasitic twins have parasitic lower limbs attached to the lower limbs or pelvis of the host. Duplicate genitalia is common in ischiophagus parasitic twinning (congenitally united twins fused at the hip). Case reports of caudal

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

From July 1, 1981 to December 31, 1990 the Urinary Stone Analysis Laboratory, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California received 292 urinary calculi from 275 Dalmatians (14 females, 14 episodes; 261 males, 278 episodes). The mean age of dogs at the time of the first episode of calculus formation was 4.5 years for males and 5.5 years for females. Bacteria were isolated from 22 of 49 calculi (45%). The bacteria were gram-positive with 2 exceptions; coagulase-positive staphylococci accounted for 62.5% of the isolates. Polarized light microscopy was used to determine the mineral content of the calculi. One hundred ninety three calculi were 100% urate; 78 calculi contained ≥ 50% urate in 1 or more layers and were classified as mixed urate calculi; 7 calculi contained < 50% urate in all layers; and 14 calculi contained no urate. The secondary minerals most commonly encountered in mixed urate calculi were struvite (77%, 60 of 78 calculi), and oxalate (17%, 13 of 78 calculi). There were 65 struvite-containing calculi, 16 oxalate-containing calculi, 7 apatite-containing calculi, 5 silica-containing calculi, and 1 calculus specimen was composed of 100% cystine. The risk of forming urate-containing calculi was high in Dalmatians, whereas the risk of forming calculi containing other minerals was consistently lower in Dalmatians than in other breeds. X-ray diffraction and high pressure liquid chromatography were performed on all calculi from dogs known to have been given allopurinol (n = 19). One hundred percent of these calculi were found to contain xanthine or other compounds related to administration of allopurinol (eg, hypoxanthine, allopurinol, or oxypurinol).

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

One hundred and seven cystine-containing urinary calculi from 1 female and 101 male dogs were analyzed. Cystine-containing calculi accounted for 2% (107 of 5,375) of all canine urinary calculi submitted to the urinary stone analysis laboratory from July 1981 through December 1989. Male dogs that formed cystine calculi were compared with 3 other canine populations to determine whether certain breeds were apparently at increased or decreased risk for cystine calculus formation. In one or more of 3 population comparisons, significantly increased risk of cystine calculus formation was found in Mastiffs, Australian Cattle Dogs, English Bulldogs, Chihuahuas, Bullmastiffs, Newfoundlands, Dachshunds, Basenjis, Australian Shepherd Dogs, Scottish Deerhounds, Staffordshire Terriers, Miniature Pinschers, pitbull terriers, Welsh Corgis, Silky Terriers, and Bichon Frises. Significantly low risk of cystine calculus formation was found in German Shepherd Dogs, Poodles, Schnauzers, and mixed-breed dogs.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association