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Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine quality-of-life changes in owners of dogs undergoing mitral valve repair for myxomatous mitral valve disease, up to 12 months postoperatively.

SAMPLE

Owners of 26 dogs undergoing mitral valve repair at a single UK veterinary referral hospital.

METHODS

Dogs underwent mitral valve repair under cardiopulmonary bypass as previously described. Owner quality of life was assessed by self-completion of a previously validated questionnaire preoperatively and at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively.

RESULTS

There was a statistically significant improvement in quality-of-life scores from preoperatively up to 3 months postoperatively and a statistically significant improvement in individual question scores up to 6 months postoperatively.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results suggested that owner quality of life is significantly improved following surgical repair of their pet’s myxomatous mitral valve disease, and this improvement continues beyond the immediate postoperative period. These results may be useful when counseling owners of surgical candidates and is another useful outcome measure.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

  • Palliative treatment of tetralogy of Fallot in dogs has included β-adrenergic blockers to reduce right ventricular obstruction secondary to infundibular spasm, creation of systemic to pulmonary artery shunts to increase pulmonary blood flow, or both.

  • Primary definitive open-heart repair is the preferred treatment in humans, but successful correction of defects in dogs is rare.

  • Adaptation of cannulation, perfusion, and myocardial protection techniques used for human pediatric cardiac patients may improve the success of cardiac surgery in dogs.

  • Open-heart correction of tetralogy of Fallot in dogs is an alternative that may be a superior therapeutic option.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

RJ , Koopman SR , Takkenberg JJ , Ten Harkel AD , Bogers AJ . Metabolic alkalosis after pediatric cardiac surgery . Eur J Cardiothorac Surg. 2005 ; 28 ( 2 ): 229 – 233 . 10.1016/j.ejcts.2005.04.013 5. Wong HR , Chundu KR

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

decision making in open-heart surgeries in dogs. VF is a significant perioperative complication during cardiac surgery in human medicine. The heart is particularly susceptible to VF immediately after releasing the crossclamp. 14 This vulnerability can be

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

, Shahbaz Y , et al. In cardiac surgery patients does Voluven(R) impair coagulation less than other colloids? Interact Cardiovasc Thorac Surg 2011 ; 12 : 1022 – 1027 . 10.1510/icvts.2010.263939 2. Sossdorf M , Marx S , Schaarschmidt B

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

received an overdose of heparin or those in which there is a need to quickly reverse the effects of heparin, but it is most commonly administered to reverse the effects of that drug following cardiac surgery. Administration of high doses of protamine is

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

T ransesophageal echocardiography (TEE), often indicated during cardiac surgery, is becoming increasingly adopted as a tool when hemodynamic instability occurs during noncardiac procedures in humans. 1 – 4 Several protocols consisting of a

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

administration (eg, during cardiopulmonary bypass procedures, 3,4 prior to surgical intervention to treat subarachnoid hemorrhage, 5 following dental extraction in hemophiliac patients, 6 during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in neonatal cardiac surgery

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

confirm this suspicion. The cause of AD in this dog was unknown. In humans, AD has been documented with ischemic heart injury and cardiac surgery but can also be incidental. 4 In dogs, it is often documented incidentally, although it has been described

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association