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Abstract

Objective—To evaluate long-term outcome of repair of femoral capital physeal fractures with 7.0-mm cannulated screws in juvenile bulls that weighed > 350 kg (770 lb).

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—20 bulls.

Procedure—Medical records of affected cattle were identified and reviewed. Follow-up information was obtained by means of a written questionnaire, 1 to 15 years after discharge, from the veterinarians who supervised the postoperative care at bull stud facilities.

Results—Mean age and body weight at time of repair were 19 months (range, 11 to 27 months) and 513 kg (1,128.6 lb; range, 364 to 720 kg [800.8 to 1,584 lb]), respectively. Surgical repair was performed with 7.0- mm cannulated screws. A second surgery to replace malpositioned implants was required in 1 bull. Fourteen of the 20 bulls were considered serviceable for semen collection after surgical repair, and persistent lameness was evident in 11 of the 14. Mean duration for bulls to become serviceable was 5.5 months (range, 2 to 11 months). Age, weight, duration of injury at the time of repair, and degree of reduction did not have a significant effect on whether surgical repair was successful. Six bulls remained severely lame and were euthanatized.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicated that surgical repair of femoral capital physeal fractures in adolescent bulls with 7.0-mm cannulated screws placed in lag fashion has a good prognosis for long-term function in a semen collection facility. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2005;227:964–969)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

required to have an anconeal process large enough to accommodate the width of the cannulated screw (Arthrex 4.0 mm partially threaded [1/2 shaft length] screws and Wright Medical 3.5 and 4.0 mm partially threaded [1/3 shaft length] screws were utilized for

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Orthopedic screws are routinely used in orthopedic surgeries. Cannulated screws provide surgeons the ability to selectively position screws before insertion into bone to improve the accuracy of placement. In human surgery, large

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine clinical, radiographic, and scintigraphic abnormalities in and treatment and outcome of horses with trauma-induced osteomyelitis of the proximal aspect of the radius.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—5 horses.

Procedure—Data collected from the medical records included signalment; history; horse use; degree of lameness; radiographic, ultrasonographic, and scintigraphic findings; treatment; and outcome.

Results—Duration of lameness prior to referral ranged from 14 to 60 days. Mean severity of lameness was grade 3 of 5, and all horses had a single limb affected. All horses had signs of pain during elbow joint manipulation and digital palpation over the lateral aspect of the proximal end of the radius. Radiographic lesions consisted of periosteal proliferation, osteolysis, and subchondral bone lysis. Scintigraphy in 3 horses revealed intense pharmaceutical uptake diffusely involving the proximal end of the radius. Two horses had sepsis of the elbow joint. All horses were treated with antimicrobials long-term; 1 horse was also treated by local perfusion of the radial medullary cavity through an indwelling cannulated screw. At follow-up, all horses had returned to their previous function.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that osteomyelitis of the proximal end of the radius can result from a traumatic injury to the antebrachium. Because lesions may be an extension of septic arthritis, a thorough examination of the wound area and elbow joint is recommended. Prolonged systemic antimicrobial treatment can result in a successful outcome. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2003;223:486–491)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

cannulated screw was removed, the hole was curetted, and the removed bone was sent for histologic examination. The horse was discharged from the hospital. Unfortunately, the horse's comfort level deteriorated, pyrexia became uncontrollable, and the owner had

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

. Human intramedullary needles are easy to place in small animals and foals, 21,22 whereas bones of adult horses require drilling to permit insertion of the needle or cannulated screw. 1 The distal end of the tube of an IV administration system also can

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

cannulated screws - a cadaveric study . Vet Comp Orthop Traumatol . 2012 ; 25 ( 1 ): 22 – 27 . doi: 10.3415/VCOT-11-05-0074 11. Kim YU , Cho HS , Kim SY , et al . Minimally invasive treatment for sacroiliac dislocation in dogs . J Vet Clin

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

, and 90 minutes after beginning the infusion. After each synovial fluid sample was collected, a new syringe was attached to the indwelling needle to avoid aspiration of air into the joint. After collection of samples at 90 minutes, the cannulated

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

MCIII. The injector syringe was loaded with a previously calculated volume of contrast medium and connected to the intraosseous cannulated screw via an extension set. The volume of infused contrast medium was calculated as 0.15 mL/kg of body weight of

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

.50002 6. Bentley VA , Edwards RB III , Santschi EM , Livesey MA . Repair of femoral capital physeal fractures with 7.0-mm cannulated screws in cattle: 20 cases (1988–2002) . J Am Vet Med Assoc . 2005 ; 227 ( 6 ): 964 – 969 . doi: 10

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association