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Introduction Canine parvovirus (CPV-2) emerged in 1978, resulting in the deaths of millions of dogs worldwide. 1 High viral stability in contaminated environments makes CPV-2 an ongoing threat for susceptible canines globally. Although

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Canine parvovirus is a highly contagious viral agent that spreads between dogs following oronasal exposure or fecal ingestion. 1,2 Despite the availability and widespread use of effective vaccines, CPV remains a major cause of morbidity and death

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Canine parvovirus first emerged in the mid-1970s as an enteric pathogen of dogs 1–3 and has remained a major pathogen worldwide. The characteristic signs of CPV enteritis include hemorrhagic diarrhea, vomiting, loss of appetite, lethargy, fever

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

parvovirus is a Protoparvovirus that infects dogs, but may have originated from cats. The survival rate for CPV-infected dogs is < 10% when left untreated and ranges from 64% to 95% when treated. 5 Canine parvovirus is transmitted by fecal

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Canine parvovirus was first identified in dogs in the late 1970s, and was named CPV type-2 (CPV-2) to distinguish it from the minute virus of canines, another parvovirus (CPV type-1) that infects dogs. Canine parvovirus type-2 was quickly

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

within the shelter. ABBREVIATIONS CDV Canine distemper virus CI Confidence interval CPV Canine parvovirus OR Odds ratio PAT Protective antibody titer a. Animal Health Diagnostic Center, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

, canine parvovirus, and canine distemper virus as provided on the submission form. Mixed-breed dogs and 73 unique pure breeds were included. Mixed-breed dogs made up 22% of the samples. Golden Retriever and Labrador Retriever samples made up 12% and 10

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

shelter. ABBREVIATIONS CDV Canine distemper virus CPV Canine parvovirus HI Hemagglutination inhibition IFA Immunofluorescence assay NPV Negative predictive value PAT Protective antibody titer PPV Positive predictive value VN Virus

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

CAV-2 Canine adenovirus type II CDV Canine distemper virus CI Confidence interval CPV Canine parvovirus Log 2 Logarithm base 2 a. Corvac serum separator tubes, Tyco Healthcare Group LP, Mansfield, Mass. b. Nalgene cryoware, Nalge Nunc

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Objective—

To determine the effect of treatment with recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) for puppies with neutropenia secondary to canine parvovirus infection.

Design—

Randomized controlled clinical trial.

Animals—

23 puppies.

Procedure—

Diagnosis was confirmed by use of an ELISA for detection of canine parvovirus antigen in feces, and all puppies received standard treatment for parvoviral enteritis. All puppies had neutropenia (< 1,000 neutrophils/μl) at the time of admission to the hospital or within 4 days afterward. Eleven puppies were treated with rhG-CSF daily until neutrophil count was > 1,500 cells/μl; the remaining 12 puppies were not treated with rhG-CSF.

Results—

We did not detect any significant differences between groups regarding duration of hospitalization, neutrophil count when neutropenia was first detected, lowest neutrophil count, or time until neutrophil count was > 1,500 cells/μl.

Clinical Implications—

Results suggest that treatment with rhG-CSF may not be beneficial in puppies with neutropenia secondary to canine parvovirus infection. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1998:213:991-992)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association