Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 223 items for :

  • "brachycephalic" x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All

Introduction Brachycephalic breeds have surged in popularity despite the worsening quality of life and reduced life expectancy from hereditary conformational issues. 1 Brachycephalic conformation has been linked to several significant disease

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Brachycephalic airway syndrome in dogs is characterized by anatomic abnormalities that include stenotic nares, aberrant nasal conchae, elongated soft palate, everted laryngeal saccules, laryngeal collapse, hypoplastic trachea of various severities

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

is likely the result of a complex, multifactorial disease process, an association between upper airway obstruction and SHH has been suggested in brachycephalic dogs. 3 , 4 , 6 Increased upper airway resistance and negative intrathoracic pressure is

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

An upper respiratory tract disease known as BAOS has been identified in brachycephalic dogs since the beginning of the 20th century. The syndrome is comprised of morphological and functional alterations involving the upper airways, lower airways

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Introduction Brachycephalic obstructive airway syndrome (BOAS) in brachycephalic dogs has been well described in the veterinary literature. 1 – 7 Aberrant nasal turbinates, a thickened and elongated soft palate, everted laryngeal saccules and

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Brachycephalic dogs have unique upper respiratory anatomy that leads to upper airway obstruction. Compared with other breeds, brachycephalic dogs have a shortened skull resulting in a compressed nasal passage and altered pharyngeal anatomy. 1

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

The precise conformation that constitutes brachycephaly has not been rigorously defined, but breeds usually considered to be brachycephalic include English and French Bulldogs, Boston Terriers, Pugs, Pekingese, and Shih Tzus. 1 In all these

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Introduction In brachycephalic dog breeds, facial retrusion, proximodistal shortening of the snout, and widening of the hard palate has been associated with several genetic loci. 1 , 2 , 3 Some brachycephalic dog breeds, such as Bulldogs

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

brachycephalic, although this subclassification is often poorly defined 1 and has been traditionally categorized on the basis of skull radiographic findings. A brachycephalic skull has shortened facial and nasal bones, small nasal cavity and frontal and

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Brachycephalic airway syndrome results from a variety of underlying anatomic abnormalities, including stenotic nares, elongated and thickened soft palate, aberrant nasal conchae, and tracheal hypoplasia. 1–3 These features cause upper airway

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association