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protozoal abortion caused by N caninum infection. Comments Bovine neosporosis is caused by N caninum , an intracellular, parasitic protozoan, from the phylum Apicomplexa. 1 – 5 Bovine neosporosis has a worldwide distribution and is associated

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate effects of vaccination of feedlot steers against bovine neosporosis on weight gain, feed intake and efficiency (feed intake per gain), and carcass characteristics.

Design—Longitudinal observational study.

Animals—60 weaned Brangus steers seronegative for Neospora caninum.

Procedure—Steers were assigned to age-matched control and treatment groups. Steers in the treatment group received N caninum vaccine on days 79 and 106, while control steers received 2 placebo injections. For each steer, serologic status for N caninum was determined on days 0 (weaning), 51, 79, 106, 135, 163, 191, 219, and 247 by use of an ELISA; body weight was determined on the same days and at slaughter (day 259). Daily feed intake per steer was measured from days 79 to 259.

Results—Seroconversion occurred in 23 of 30 (76.7%) steers in the vaccinated group. Immediately after vaccination, average daily gain, average daily feed intake, and feed efficiency were significantly greater in the treatment group than in the control group, but these differences did not persist. No differences between groups were found in regard to live weight at slaughter, hot carcass weight, dressing percentage, or quality grade; however, steers in the vaccinated group had significantly lower yield grades than did control steers.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—In feedlot steers, use of this vaccine against N caninum was safe and did not affect overall feedlot performance or meat quality; effects on yield grade require further evaluation. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2003;222:624–627)

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective

To test the hypothesis that cats are definitive hosts of Neospora caninum.

Animals

6 weaned male kittens obtained from 2 sources, and several dozen outbred mice.

Procedure

Cats were fed large numbers of 3 strains of N caninum: tissue cysts in buffered saline solution, mouse brain homogenates, and whole carcass homogenates from seropositive mice. Fecal specimens were examined for 4 weeks by use of flotation tests, and bioassays were performed in mice. One cat was inoculated parenterally with tachyzoites, to determine whether cats could respond serologically to N caninum. Tissue cysts from portions of oral inocula were cultured to verify viability. Indirect fluorescent antibody serologic testing, histologic and immunohistologic examinations, cell culture, and polymerase chain reaction procedures were performed 4 to 8 weeks after oral exposure, to seek evidence of infection of cats and mice.

Results

None of the cats or mice seroconverted to N caninum, with the exception of the single cat inoculated parenterally. Fecal shedding of oocysts was not observed, except for Isospora felis oocysts that were shed by 2 cats beginning prior to oral challenge exposure. Evidence of infection was not detected in tissues of cats or mice, with the exception of the parenterally inoculated cat.

Conclusions

The hypothesis that cats are definitive hosts of N caninum is not supported.

Clinical Relevance

Extermination of cats in efforts to control bovine neosporosis is not warranted. (Am J Vet Res 1998;59:441–444)

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

favorable for the development of natural reservoirs of infectious agents (viruses, bacteria, and parasites) and transmission vectors of RID. 14 The objective of this research was to determine seroprevalence of bovine neosporosis (BN), bovine leptospirosis

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Neospora caninum infection in wildlife . Int J Parasitol Parasites Wildl 2015 ; 4 : 216 – 238 . 10.1016/j.ijppaw.2015.04.002 2. Dubey JP Buxton D Wouda W . Pathogenesis of bovine neosporosis . J Comp Pathol 2006 ; 134 : 267 – 289 . 10

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

. Dubey JP Buxton D Wouda W . Pathogenesis of bovine neosporosis . J Comp Pathol 2006 ; 134 : 267 – 289 . 10.1016/j.jcpa.2005.11.004 29. Guy CS Williams DJL Kelly DF , et al. Neospora caninum in persistently infected, pregnant

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Res 2002 ; 88 : 44 – 52 . 10.1007/s004360100496 37. Stuart P Zintl A Waal TD , et al. Investigating the role of wild carnivores in the epidemiology of bovine neosporosis . Parasitology 2013 ; 140 : 296 – 302 . 10.1017/S0031182012001588

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

population health and reproduction at the university's School of Veterinary Medicine. Her research interests include lentivirus infections in small ruminants, bovine neosporosis, and reproductive epidemiology in cattle, sheep, and goats. A diplomate of the

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association