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Alternatively, a method of extrapolation, based on body surface area (BSA), is commonly used for chemotherapeutic agents due to the small therapeutic ratio of these medications. 4 The formula most commonly used in veterinary medicine is BSA = K X (W) 2/3 where

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Body surface area has been used as a basis for calculation of doses for drugs with a narrow therapeutic index in veterinary and human medicine since the early 1950s. 1 Initial studies 2,3 in humans used various methods, including paper cutouts

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

. ABBREVIATIONS AIC Akaike information criterion BSA Body surface area ICC Intraclass correlation coefficient MSE Mean square error Footnotes a. MAQUET, Datascope Passport 2, Wayne, NJ. b. Light Speed, GE Healthcare, Milwaukee, Wis. c. 3D

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

calculated BSA for each subject. This process was performed once for each animal, and the BSA value for each animal was then used for further analysis. Statistical analysis Body surface area was plotted against body weight, and a K constant was

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Summary

Pharmacokinetics and toxicity of a single dose of doxorubicin, at dosages of 30 mg/m2 of body surface area and 1 mg/kg of body weight, were compared in 17 dogs. Effects of doxorubicin on complete blood cell count, platelet count, and the dogs' clinical condition were evaluated for 14 days. Cluster analysis, on the basis of clinical signs of doxorubicin toxicosis at the 30- mg/m2 dosage, revealed that 6 of 7 small dogs (≤ 10 kg) became ill, whereas 7 of 10 large dogs (> 10 kg) remained clinically normal. Small dogs that received doxorubicin at a dosage of 30 mg/m2 had higher peak plasma concentrations, greater area under the curve for plasma drug concentration vs time, longer drug elimination half - lives, greater volumes of distribution, and more clinical signs of toxicosis than had large dogs (P ≤ 0.05). Five of 9 small dogs that received doxorubicin at a dosage of 30 mg/m2 developed severe myelosuppression (<1 × 103 granulocytes/μl). In contrast to the toxicoses with body surface area - based dosing, myelosuppression was not induced in small dogs that received doxorubicin at a dosage of 1 mg/kg. In small and large dogs given doxorubicin at a dosage of 1 mg/kg, pharmacokinetic characteristics and clinical signs of toxicosis were similar. Mean wbc counts and granulocyte counts for all dogs were lower on day 7 with 30 mg of doxorubicin/m2 (n = 17), compared with that for 1 mg of doxorubicin/kg (n = 14; P ≤ 0.01).This study indicated that a body weight - based (milligram per kilogram) dosing regimen may result in more uniform therapeutic and toxic responses in dogs. Limited toxicosis was observed in dogs weighing > 10 kg treated with doxorubicin with either dosing scheme; however, differences in pharmacokinetic profiles suggested that 1 mg/kg may be an inappropriately low dosage.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

simultaneously captured ECG on the Doppler image used for calculating VTI. Values obtained were indexed to body surface area to correct for somatotype variation, with body surface area calculated from the following equation on the basis of body weight 20,21 as

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

species-specific treatment protocol without known published studies. The majority of chemotherapeutic drugs are administered on the basis of body surface area (BSA) rather than weight. 5 – 11 BSA measurements are proportional to metabolic rate and

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

In the report “Comparison of peak flow velocity through the left ventricular outflow tract and effective orifice area indexed to body surface area in Golden Retriever puppies to predict development of subaortic stenosis in adult dogs” ( J Am Vet

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association