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blood from a peripheral vein for a CBC is routinely performed in the diagnostic evaluation of systemically ill cats, and this EDTA-anticoagulated whole blood provides a potential source for the detection of Histoplasma DNA in cats with disseminated

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

. More recently, obtundation has been found as a risk factor for early death, with a decreasing risk over time. 9 Various biomarkers have been studied in blood and/or CSF in MUO cases, as distinct immunoglobulin-family autoantibodies (eg, IgA, IgC, IgM

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Introduction Citrate phosphate dextrose adenine (CPDA-1) is an anticoagulant preservative used commonly in human and veterinary blood banking. Currently, CPDA-1 is the preservative of choice in transfusion medicine. 1 Within this compound

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Blood-borne infectious diseases are some of the most serious concerns among operators of human blood banks. By 1985, when the causative organism for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome was identified and tests were developed to screen donated blood

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To conduct serologic surveillance for Leishmania spp in English Foxhounds from a kennel, as well as recipients of blood from these dogs, and determine whether L infantum organisms could be transmitted via blood transfusion.

Design—Serologic prevalence survey.

Animals—120 English Foxhounds and 51 dogs of various breeds receiving blood from these donors.

Procedure—Foxhound blood donors, foxhound nondonors, and nonfoxhound blood recipient dogs were evaluated serologically for Leishmania spp by indirect fluorescent antibody testing. Dogs that received packed RBC (PRBC) transfusions from foxhound donors from mid-1996 through mid-2000 were identified. Furthermore, dogs were serologically evaluated if they had received fresh frozen plasma (FFP) transfusions in 1999 and 2000 from seropositive foxhound blood donors.

Results—Thirty percent of the English Foxhounds were seropositive for Leishmania spp (titer ≥ 1:16), although the degree of seropositivity varied considerably during the period. Furthermore, 57 foxhounds had been used as donors from 1996 to 2000, and 342 units of PRBC had been transfused to at least 227 patients. All 25 dogs screened that received PRBC from seronegative foxhound donors tested negative, whereas 3 of 7 dogs that received PRBC from seropositive donors tested positive. All 9 dogs that received FFP from seropositive foxhound donors remained seronegative.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—To our knowledge, this report documents the first transmission of Leishmania spp by blood transfusion. The use of foxhounds as blood donors may not be advisable in North America. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2001;219:1081–1088)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Preoperative blood donation is routinely performed in horses as part of a presurgical autologous blood transfusion protocol used before elective surgical procedures, such as sinus surgery. 1,2 Traditional homologous donor transfusions are

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

There is a paucity of information available on the hemodynamic and biochemical responses to acute blood loss in standing, awake horses. To the authors' knowledge, only 1 study 1 has evaluated the effects of acute blood loss on arterial and pulse

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

An increase in the demand for blood components associated with better emergency and critical care treatments has led to the creation of several animal blood banks as well as an increase in the number of animals that provide frequent blood

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether blood type, breed, or sex were risk factors for immune-mediated hemolytic anemia (IMHA) in dogs and whether bacteremia was common in dogs with IMHA.

Design—Case-control study.

Animals—33 dogs with IMHA, 1,014 dogs without IMHA for which blood type (dog erythrocyte antigens 1.1, 1.2, 3, 4, 5, and 7) was known, 15,668 dogs without IMHA for which breed was known, and 15,589 dogs without IMHA for which sex was known.

Procedure—Blood type, breed, and sex distribution of dogs with IMHA were compared with data for control dogs with Fisher exact tests and by calculating odds ratios (ORs). Results of bacterial culture of blood samples were documented for dogs with IMHA, when available.

Results—Dog erythrocyte antigen 7 was associated with a significant protective effect (OR, 0.1) in Cocker Spaniels with IMHA (n = 10), compared with control dogs. Cocker Spaniels, Bichon Frise, Miniature Pinschers, Rough-coated Collies, and Finnish Spitz had a significantly increased risk of IMHA, as did female dogs (OR, 2.1). Blood samples from 12 dogs with IMHA were submitted for bacterial culture, and none had bacteremia.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that blood type, breed, and sex may play a role in IMHA in dogs. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2004;224:232–235)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

In human and small animal medicine, hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia are common hematologic abnormalities. Treatment for either condition requires serial measurements of blood glucose concentrations with near instantaneous results. Therefore, POC

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research