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T icks are common ectoparasites on horses in the United States. 1 In the United States, over 15% of equids and 29% of equine operations have reported tick infestations. 2 In particular, the blacklegged tick ( Ixodes scapularis ) poses

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

infection (“blackleg”) in a heifer. Comments Clostridium chauvoei is an anaerobic, gram-positive bacteria that is commonly found as highly resistant spores in soil and is the causative agent of blackleg. 1 There are many other clostridial diseases

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

C novyi, C septicum , and C sordellii . Morphologic Diagnosis Severe necrosuppurative myocarditis and fibrinosuppurative epicarditis (consistent with C chauvoei infection [clostridial cardiac myonecrosis, also known as visceral blackleg

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

labeled for the treatment and prevention of flea ( Ctenocephalides felis ) infestations and treatment and control of black-legged tick ( Ixodes scapularis ), American dog tick ( Dermacentor variabilis ), brown dog tick ( Rhipicephalus sanguineus ), and

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

reportable to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are tick-borne. Nine species of tick found throughout North American are known vectors for these pathogens. Of these, Ixodes scapularis , the blacklegged or deer tick, is the most medically

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

cattle are instead infected with the related Anaplasma phagocytophilum , seropositivity can ensue due to immunological cross-reactivity. 1 , 16 – 18 Historically, this has not been a significant concern because of the restricted range of the blacklegged

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

. Detection of Babesia, Borrelia, Anaplasma , and Rickettsia spp. in adult black-legged ticks ( Ixodes scapularis ) from Pennsylvania, United States, with a Luminex multiplex bead assay . Vector Borne Zoonotic Dis . 2020 ; 20 ( 6 ): 406 – 411 . doi: 10

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

produce exotoxins. 4 Various diseases (clostridial myositis, blackleg, black disease, so-called big head of sheep and goats, bacillary hemoglobinuria, enterotoxemia, tetanus, and botulism) are caused by infections with bacteria in the genus Clostridium

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

one health.” Blacklegged ticks are widely distributed across the eastern United States and are vectors for Lyme disease, anaplasmosis, relapsing fever disease, ehrlichiosis, babesiosis, and Powassan virus disease. (Photo by James Gathany

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

burgdorferi, the bacterium that causes Lyme disease, the number one vector-borne disease in the U.S. A worm-like, spiral-shaped bacterium, Borrelia burgdorferi is carried and transmitted primarily by the blacklegged tick known as the deer tick. The tick is

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association