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, 18 , 20 Biomechanical assessments of the tibiotarsus are another measure of bone quality in poultry research. 21 The 3-point bending test has been commonly used to quantify breaking strength and other values for the tibiotarsus. This test involves

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

bones or synthetic bones. In only a few of these studies 5,18,25–28 have the biomechanical properties of the constructs been tested under cyclic loading, even though cyclic loading is considered to be a more relevant testing method than single load to

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

than pins, screws, and PMMA may also avoid the previously mentioned possible adverse consequences associated with bilateral fixation and PMMA. A biomechanical study 6 involving canine cadaveric specimens revealed that when bent in flexion, the lumbar

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

placed. 10 The pattern is finalized with 2 square knots. 10 Anecdotally, we have encountered numerous other variations on the theme. Other investigators have biomechanically evaluated and compared finger trap sutures with 4 knots to the 4 friction

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To compare structural properties of a plate-rod combination–bone construct (PRCbc) and interlocking nail–bone construct (ILNbc) by use of an experimentally induced gap fracture in canine tibiae.

Sample Population—12 paired canine tibiae.

Procedure—Specimens were implanted with a plate-rod combination consisting of a 3.5-mm, limited-contact, dynamic-compression plate combined with an intramedullary rod or 6-mm interlocking nail. Ostectomy (removal of 10-mm segment) was performed. Paired constructs were loaded for bending, compression, or torsion measurements (4 constructs/group). Compliance was determined by fitting regression lines to the load-position curves at low (initial compliance) and high (terminal compliance) loads.

Results—Bending compliances did not differ significantly between constructs. For the ILNbc, initial compliance was greater than terminal compliance in compression and torsion. Initial compliance and terminal compliance for the PRCbc were similar in compression and torsion. Initial compliance in compression and torsion was greater for the ILNbc, compared with initial compliance for the PRCbc. Maximum deformations in bending and compression were similar between constructs; however, maximum torsional angle was significantly greater for the ILNbc, compared with values for the PRCbc.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The study documented that for an experimentally induced gap fracture in canine tibiae, a plate-rod combination is a significantly less compliant fixation method in torsion and compression, compared with an interlocking nail. Considering the deleterious effects of torsional deformation on bone healing, a plate-rod combination may represent a biomechanically superior fixation method, compared with an interlocking nail, for the treatment of dogs with comminuted tibial diaphyseal fractures. (Am J Vet Res 2005;66:1536–1543)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

and moment to failure as locking compression plates applied to equine cervical vertebrae. 20 The purpose of the study reported here was to evaluate in vitro the biomechanical properties of 4 techniques that are used to facilitate fusion of the

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

biomechanical outcomes following surgical intervention is warranted. Tibial plateau leveling osteotomy biomechanically alters a stifle joint to eliminate cranial tibial translation in the CrCL-deficient stifle joint by decreasing the TPA so that weight

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

integrated into ICP monitoring in clinical practice. This can be attributed to uncertainties related to the accuracy and validity of the measurements obtained. Biomechanical models can assist in the noninvasive estimation of ICP. The earliest simulations of

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

(black arrow) full-thickness simple interrupted sutures. Cranial is to the top of the photos. For biomechanical testing, the stomach and attached section of abdominal wall, including the gastropexy site, were removed from the LRS. A tensile test

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

-profile gastrostomy tubes in humans and were initially evaluated in canine cadavers but without biomechanical testing. 14 Biomechanical comparison of T-fasteners with other standard surgical techniques for prophylactic gastropexy in canine cadavers has been reported

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research