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Introduction Gallbladder mucocele (GBM) is an increasingly recognized biliary disease in dogs 1 – 8 and is characterized by an accumulation of thick amorphous mucus in the gallbladder, possibly due to biliary stasis and hypersecretion. 9 , 10

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

of biliary disease that did not include use of surgery were excluded. Procedures Data extracted from medical records included sex, breed, body weight, age at surgery, survival time, concurrent disease, preoperative and postoperative CBC and

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

cholecystectomy alone in dogs ranges from 7% to 33.3% and in humans is approximately 30%, with a better prognosis possible when performed in response to GBM versus other biliary diseases. 2,3,5,6,11 Indications for extrahepatic biliary tract surgery include GBM

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

of the mucolytic effects of NAC. In clinical practice, mucolytics would be used in dogs with biliary disease to decrease the viscosity of biliary sludge or help dissolve a gallbladder mucocele, and we believe the viscosity-decreasing effect of NAC

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

have transient causes of EHBO, are too unstable to undergo more invasive biliary diversion techniques, or have biliary diseases that could benefit from palliation alone. Acknowledgments The authors declare that there were no conflicts of

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

yielded no growth. Cystic biliary disease is rare in dogs and cats. The cysts are lined by a single layer of biliary epithelium and may vary in size. Typical ultrasonographic appearance of hepatic cysts includes thin walls, absence of internal echoes

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

for decompression of the biliary tract in dogs 1209 Biliary rerouting procedures have been used with success in dogs with extrahepatic biliary diseases in which the underlying disease process prevents normal passage of bile from the hepatic ducts

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Canine extrahepatic biliary diseases are uncommon and often surgically challenging. Extrahepatic biliary obstruction and leakage of bile with subsequent bile peritonitis represent the most common clinical syndromes. The most common causes of

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

, biliary disease, pancreatic disease, and intestinal disease are often concurrent pathological changes that are linked to anatomic characteristics. 10 The common bile duct merges with the pancreatic duct and travels adjacent to pancreatic parenchyma before

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

of gastrointestinal tract, pancreatic, or extrahepatic biliary disease revealed that this was an effective method of providing postoperative enteral nutritional supplementation with a low rate of serious postoperative complications. See PAGE 380

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association