Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 70 items for :

  • "bearded dragon" x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All

H epatic lipidosis, or fatty liver disease, is the progressive accumulation of triacylglycerols in hepatocytes resulting in hepatocellular dysfunction. 1 It is exceedingly common in reptiles but particularly in the central bearded dragon ( Pogona

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

administration of euthanasia solution in bearded dragons and builds on prior work performed in aquatic chelonians and wild birds. 9 , 12 It was hypothesized that transmucosal pentobarbital would induce euthanasia without the need for a secondary method within 24

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

reptiles; as current veterinary assays measure this metabolite, measurement of bile acids in reptiles is a potentially useful diagnostic tool in the evaluation of reptile hepatic disease. 16 – 20 Both renal and hepatic disease in bearded dragons present

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

patients, which may complicate ultrasonographic examination and interpretation. A recent comparison of the CT and cadaveric anatomy of bearded dragons, green iguanas, and black and white tegus highlights this anatomic variability. 7 Bearded dragons

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

have not been comprehensively characterized in other reptile species, including the inland bearded dragon. Species-specific characterization of normal neurological examination findings can prevent misinterpretation and improve diagnostic utility

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Introduction A 3-year-old 0.554-kg (1.22-lb) female bearded dragon ( Pogona vitticeps ; bearded dragon 1) was examined by the North Carolina State University College of Veterinary Medicine's Exotic Animal Medicine Service because of a

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

ventilation. 3–7 However, more recent studies of Dumeril monitors ( Varanus dumerili ) 8 and inland bearded dragons ( Pogona vitticeps ) 9 anesthetized with inhalation anesthetics revealed that there were no significant or clinically relevant differences in

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Bearded dragons ( Pogona vitticeps ) are one of the most common reptile companion animals in the United States, Europe, and Australia. 1–3 Similar to many other reptiles, sick bearded dragons can become a diagnostic challenge because of

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Introduction Bearded dragons ( Pogona vitticeps ) are popular pets. Although reports 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 , 5 , 6 , 7 , 8 of neoplasia in bearded dragons are limited, findings from a 2004 retrospective survey 9 indicate that the overall prevalence

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

been described in several reptilian species (including tortoises, 12 sea turtles, 13 and alligators 15 ) but has not, to our knowledge, been described for bearded dragons ( Pogona spp). The objective of the study reported here was to evaluate the

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research