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In human females without symptoms of lower urinary tract infection, asymptomatic bacteriuria is defined as the presence of ≥ 10 5 CFUs/mL of a single bacterial pathogen in 2 consecutive midstream urine specimens. 1,2 Asymptomatic bacteriuria is

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

environment. This may increase the likelihood of nosocomial bacteriuria. 12 The objective of the study reported here was to determine whether use of a closed urine collection system would decrease the incidence of nosocomial bacteriuria in hospitalized dogs

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

. Table 1— Salmonella serotypes identified in samples from a cat with Salmonella bacteriuria being fed a contaminated granular diet (cat 1), along with samples from another cat in the household (cat 2) and related environmental samples

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

extrusion of the nucleus pulposus into the vertebral canal. Management of dogs diagnosed with thoracolumbar IVDH Hansen type I often requires surgical decompression. However, secondary urinary dysfunction and bacteriuria are common. 2 , 3 The prevalence of

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

implies the presence of dysuria, pollakiuria, and urgency, in addition to bacteriuria. 5 Except for pregnant women or people undergoing invasive urologic procedures, treatment is not recommended for human patients with SBU, even if they are

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

urethra. 1 In dogs specifically, urinary catheterization has been significantly associated with hospital-acquired UTIs or bacteriuria. 2 , a In a veterinary referral hospital intensive care unit, the overall frequency of CAUTI development in dogs was

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Bacterial UTIs are common in dogs. Authors of 1 report 1 estimated that 14% of dogs have ≥ 1 UTI during their lifetime. A UTI is diagnosed on the basis of clinical signs consistent with the condition and documented bacteriuria. The gold standard

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

bacteriuria. 13 – 15 In dogs, empirical treatment for APN with antimicrobials with known efficacy against Enterobacteriaceae (eg, fluoroquinolones, third-generation cephalosporins) is often recommended. 5 Fluoroquinolones are favored over β

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

faecalis and E faecium isolated from urine samples of dogs with recurrent UTIs. 3 , 4 The presence of uroliths and neoplasia and anatomic abnormalities of the LUT have been identified as risk factors for both recurrent UTI and enterococcal bacteriuria

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

under the instruction of their veterinarian to do so. In recent years, there have been several publications reporting the use of a point-of-care, bacteriuria, rapid immunoassay (RIA) urine detection test (RapidBacVet; Silver Lake Research Corp). 3 – 5

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association