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C anine idiopathic laryngeal paralysis (ILP) is a common degenerative peripheral polyneuropathy in dogs. 1 , 2 ILP is considered an axonopathy, characterized by degeneration and loss of the largest and longest axons, with the recurrent laryngeal

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

indicated a distally enhanced intermediate axonopathy with subtle to massive changes in axons and myelin sheaths and clear proximodistal advancement. The most severely affected nerves were those that were the longest, which were the vagus nerve and its

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

nerve, making them more easily impacted by disease. 4 To date, several breed and familial polyneuropathies in cats have been described, including type IV glycogen storage disease in Norwegian Forest Cats, 5 peripheral and central axonopathy in Birmans

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

transmission. Despite the mild decrease of tibial nerve CMAP amplitude, existence of a neuropathy (axonopathy) or myopathy was judged unlikely because of absence of generalized electromyographic abnormalities and unremarkable electroneurographic findings for

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

neuropathy involving multiple cranial nerves included neoplasia (meningioma, peripheral nerve sheath tumor [PNST], or ganglioma), laryngeal paralysis (congenital or acquired [polyneuropathy or distal axonopathy, idiopathic, hypothyroidism, or trauma] form

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

axonopathies, myelin loss, and myelinophagia) were detected. Histologic examination of peripheral nerves included evaluation for increased Schwann cell proliferation, intactness of axons and myelin sheaths, and regular occurrence of nodes of Ranvier. However

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

In horses, RLN is a common upper airway disorder resulting in decreased athletic performance and altered upper airway dynamics. 1–3 Disturbance of upper airway dynamics is precipitated by the characteristic progressive degenerative axonopathy of

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

In horses, RLN is a common disease of the laryngeal muscles in which primary axonopathy of the recurrent laryngeal nerve results in secondary neurogenic atrophy and dysfunction of the intrinsic laryngeal muscles that it innervates. 1–4 Recurrent

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research