Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 53 items for :

  • "avulsion fracture" x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All

avulsion fracture at the insertion of the semimembranosus muscle on the proximal tibial epiphysis. The TPA was 23°, and the mMPTA was 93°. Figure 1 Mediolateral (A) and craniocaudal (B) radiographic images of the left tibia of a 4-month-old 10-kg (22

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Introduction Tibial tuberosity avulsion fractures (TTAFs) are relatively uncommon traumatic injuries in the young canine. 1 – 4 TTAFs usually occur around 4 to 10 months of age, but are reported between 2 and 22 months of age, and American

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

injury extending into the cortex and medulla of the third metacarpus (MC3) presenting in the form of avulsion fractures, 6 , 7 enthesophyte formation, 1 or MC3 palmar cortical endosteal reaction. 8 Fracture to the palmar cortex of proximal MC3 is

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

joint was undertaken, revealing marked distention of the medial femorotibial joint recess. Ultrasonography revealed a fracture on the proximomedial aspect of the patella, an avulsion fracture associated with the origin of the femorotibial lateral

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

evaluation. Fractures were identified in 8 horses. Fractures in 6 of 8 horses were considered to be avulsion fractures and involved the origin of the CL on the third metacarpal or third metatarsal bone (6 fragments) and the insertion onto the proximal phalanx

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

callus formation. Proximal displacement of the patella is evident. The final radiographic diagnosis was chronic left tibial tuberosity avulsion fracture with subsequent proximal displacement of the patella and callus formation. Figure 2— Same

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

this area are not possible, considering our clinical, nuclear scintigraphic, and radiographic findings, a diagnosis of an avulsion fracture of the insertion of the round ligament of the head of the femur was made. Figure 2— Same radiographic image

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

tear or avulsion fracture of the caudal cruciate ligament was present. Figure 3— Sagittal heavily T2-weighted spoiled gradient echo with multiple echoes (A) and coronal fat-saturated proton density (B) MRI images and axial CT image (C) of the left

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

and Interpretation An avulsion fracture of the lateral malleolus, widening of the talocalcaneal joint, and soft tissue swelling around the tarsus are evident on the dorsoplantar radiographic view ( Figure 2 ). Cortical disruption compatible with a

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association