Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 151 items for :

  • "atherosclerosis" x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All

this search at each institution included any of the following: aneurysm, cardiac, vascular, cardiomegaly, arrhythmia, murmur, exophthalmia, atherosclerosis, arteriosclerosis, cardiomyopathy, effusion, pleural, pericardial, coelomic effusion, heart

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Atherosclerosis is a disease of elastic and muscular arteries characterized by vascular inflammation and buildup of cholesterol, fibrin, calcium, and cellular waste products within the intima of the vessel wall. The buildup results in plaque

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory fibroproliferative vascular disease characterized by the buildup of atheromatous materials composed of numerous compounds including inflammatory cells, lipid, calcium, and collagen in the luminal aspect of

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

heart failure secondary to pulmonary atherosclerosis. Although pulmonary arterial pressures have not been established for clinically normal birds, an estimated pulmonary systolic pressure of at least 90 mm Hg identified in this parrot would be considered

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

of the terminal portion of the aorta and the left external iliac, left and right common carotid, and right brachial arteries ( Figure 2 ), suggestive of atherosclerosis. Echocardiography was performed, and results were unremarkable. Because

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Atherosclerosis is characterized by hardening of the arteries and plaque formation and is widely reported in humans, other mammals, and birds. A high intake of cholesterol or an imbalance in dietary fatty acids can accelerate the development of

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To examine whether obese cats, compared with lean cats, have alterations in lipoprotein metabolism that might lead to a decrease in glucose metabolism and insulin secretion.

Animals—10 lean and 10 obese adults cats (5 neutered males and 5 neutered females each).

Procedure—Intravenous glucose tolerance tests with measurements of serum glucose, insulin, and nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA) concentrations were performed. Lipoprotein fractions were examined in serum by isopycnic density gradient ultracentrifugation.

Results—Obese cats had insulin resistance. Plasma triglyceride and cholesterol concentrations were significantly increased in obese cats, compared with lean cats. Very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) concentrations were increased in obese cats, compared with lean cats; however, the composition of various fractions remained unchanged between obese and lean cats, indicating greater synthesis and catabolism of VLDL in obese cats. Serum high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol concentrations were increased in obese cats, compared with lean cats. Serum NEFA concentrations were only significantly different between obese and lean cats when separated by sex; obese male cats had higher baseline serum NEFA concentrations and greater NEFA suppression in response to insulin, compared with lean male cats.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Lipid metabolism changes in obese cats, compared with lean cats. The increase in VLDL turnover in obese cats might contribute to insulin resistance of glucose metabolism, whereas the increase in serum HDL cholesterol concentration might reflect a protective effect against atherosclerosis in obese cats. (Am J Vet Res 2003;64:299–303)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

diagnosis: aortic atherosclerosis with aneurysm and rupture. Case summary: ruptured aortic aneurysm caused by atherosclerosis in a flamingo. Comments Atherosclerosis is a common disease process found in avian species. Factors that contribute to its

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objectives

To address the problem of heparin binding to leukocytes of various animal species.

Design

Leukocytes of the various species were incubated with fluorescent-labeled, low molecular mass heparin (LMMH). Fluorescence intensity on granulocytes, lymphocytes, and monocytes was analyzed by flow cytometry analysis.

Sample Population

Leukocytes were prepared from EDTA-anticoagulated blood of human subjects, rats, rabbits, dogs, pigs, and sheep 3 times.

Procedure

The leukocyte populations were identified by their light scatter properties. In addition, phycoerythrin-labeled CD4, CD13, and CD14 antibodies were used to identify human lymphocytes, granulocytes, and monocytes; CD4, GR-1, and CD11b antibodies were used for mouse, and CD45, RP 3, and ED 9 antibodies were used for identification of rat leukocyte subpopulations.

Results

Granulocytes, monocytes, and lymphocytes of all species bound LMMH in dose-dependent manner. Binding of LMMH-tyramine (tyr)-fluorescein-5-isothiocyanate (FITC) to granulocytes was higher in human subjects, rats, rabbits, dogs, and pigs, compared with binding to monocytes and lymphocytes. Mouse and sheep granulocytes did not bind more heparin than monocytes or lymphocytes. Binding of LMMH-tyr-FITC was reversible in the presence of unlabeled heparin or LMMH. More than 99% of human, rat, rabbit, dog, and sheep granulocyte populations were distinguished from monocytes and lymphocytes by means of their fluorescence intensity owing to LMMH-tyr-FITC. This separation was not obtained for mouse and pig granulocytes.

Conclusion

Evidence of specific heparin binding to granulocytes of many species indicates the relevance of fluorescent-labeled LMMH for biological investigations.

Clinical Relevance

Binding of heparin and LMMH to granulocytes, lymphocytes, and monocytes may have a substantial role in atherosclerosis, inflammation, malignancy, and immunologic diseases. (Am J Vet Res 1996;57:1016–1020)

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research