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History A 4-year-old spayed female American Staffordshire Terrier mix was presented for a multiple-week history of progressive ataxia and collapsing episodes. Approximatively 2 weeks prior to presentation, the owner reported that the dog

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

general physical examination were unremarkable for all puppies. Neurologic examination of the 2 affected puppies revealed unremarkable mentation and behavior; broad-base stance in all 4 limbs; persistent, fine head tremors; mild truncal ataxia; and mild

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

findings documented included ataxia (197/223 [88.3%]), hyperesthesia (168/223 [75.3%]), lethargy/depressed mentation (140/223 [62.8%]), urine incontinence (102/223 [45.7%]), and vomiting (58/223 [26%]). A total of 157 of 223 (70.4%) dogs had a combination

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Introduction The prevalences of underlying causes of ataxia attributed to lesions in the spinal cord or vertebral column (spinal ataxia) in horses are not well-defined. Ataxia in horses is defined clinically as vestibular, cerebellar, or

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Lameness is the most common gait abnormality in horses, but ataxia associated with spinal cord disease also causes a gait disorder frequently seen in equine practice. 1,2 Clinicians generally recognize a neurologic gait abnormality, as compared

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine the usefulness of magnetic motor-evoked potentials (MMEPs) for assessing the integrity of the cervical, thoracic, and thoracolumbar spinal cord in horses with bilateral hind limb ataxia.

Animals—9 horses and 1 donkey with bilateral hind limb ataxia of various degrees.

Procedure—The motor cortex was stimulated magnetically, and MMEPs were recorded bilaterally from the extensor carpi radialis and cranial tibial muscles.

Results—In 5 horses and 1 donkey, MMEPs with normal onset latencies and peak-to-peak amplitude were recorded from the extensor carpi radialis muscles, whereas abnormal onset latencies and peak-topeak amplitudes were recorded from the cranial tibial muscles. In these animals, a spinal cord lesion in the thoracic or thoracolumbar segments was suspected. In 4 horses, onset latencies and peak-topeak amplitude of MMEPs recorded from the extensor carpi radialis and cranial tibial muscles were abnormal. In these horses, a cervical spinal cord lesion was suspected.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Transcranial magnetic stimulation can be considered a valuable diagnostic tool for assessing the integrity of the spinal cord, and MMEPs may be used for differentiating thoracic or thoracolumbar spinal cord lesions from mild cervical spinal cord lesions that cause ataxia in the hind limbs only. (Am J Vet Res 2003;64:1382–1386)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

History A 20-month-old 35-kg neutered male German Shepherd Dog was presented to the Cornell University Hospital for Animals Neurology service for evaluation of chronic, progressive ataxia and paraparesis. The clinical signs began approximately

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

History A 6-year-old sexually intact male Weimaraner presented to the Dick White Referrals neurology service with a history of 3 months of infrequent upper respiratory stertor, 1 week of changed bark, and 2 days of vestibular ataxia, right

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association