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protein concentration were 50% and 7.8 g/dL, respectively. Figure 1— Craniocaudal and mediolateral radiographic views of the elbow joint of a dog with lead arthropathy. Notice the 7- to 9-mm bullet fragment in the joint space in the preoperative

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To assay concentrations of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) in canine sera and synovial fluid (SF), to compare COMP concentrations in clinically normal dogs and dogs with joint disease, and to analyze changes in COMP concentrations in dogs with experimentally induced acute synovitis.

Animals—69 control dogs without joint disease, 23 dogs with naturally occurring aseptic arthropathy, and 6 dogs with experimentally induced synovitis.

Procedure—Serum (n = 69) and SF (36) were obtained from control dogs. Samples of serum (n = 23) and SF (13) were obtained from dogs with naturally occurring aseptic arthropathy with or without radiographic features of osteoarthritis (OA). Serum and SF were obtained before and 1, 2, 3, and 7 days after induction of synovitis. The COMP concentrations were determined by use of an inhibition ELISA that had canine cartilage COMP and monoclonal antibody against human COMP.

Results—Concentrations of COMP in serum and SF of control dogs were 31.3 ± 15.3 and 298.7 ± 124.7 μg/ml, respectively. In naturally occurring OA, COMP concentrations in serum (44.9 ± 17.7 μg/ml) and SF (401.7 ± 74.3 μg/ml) were significantly higher than corresponding concentrations in control dogs. The COMP concentration in SF peaked 24 and 48 hours after induction of synovitis, whereas concentration in serum peaked on day 3.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—These results supported the hypothesis that COMP concentration in serum and SF of dogs may be altered after cartilage degradation or synovitis. Measurement of COMP concentrations can be useful when differentiating arthropathies in dogs. (Am J Vet Res 2002;63:598–603)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

fetlock and tarsocrural joints, deforming arthropathy in the tarsal joints, and pathologic changes in the navicular bones in young Hanoverian Warmbloods have been determined. 7,12,13,17 However, detailed information derived from radiographic findings in

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

of inflammation in arthropathies in humans. 28–30,32 Authors 46,56 have suggested that IL-8 could relate to the ongoing inflammation within a joint. High IL-8 expression has also been detected in dogs with immune-mediated arthritis in a slightly

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

palmar aspect of the third metacarpal bone. Forty-nine (14%) injuries were attributed to solar pain, 24 (6.8%) to injury of the superficial digital flexor tendon, 19 (5.4%) to arthropathy of the tarsometatarsal joint or distal intertarsal joint, 18 (5

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To compare toxicokinetic variables and associated tissue drug concentrations with severity of articular lesions in weight-bearing joints of juvenile rabbits after oral administration of a fluoroquinolone.

Animals—Ten 6- to 7-week-old, 800- to 1,200-g, New Zealand White rabbits.

Procedures—Rabbits were gavaged daily with the fluoroquinolone PD 117596 at 500 mg/kg of body weight for 5 days. Blood samples were collected on day 4 at preestablished times, up to 24 hours after drug administration. On day 5 gross lesion severity and prevalence were evaluated in the major weight-bearing joints, and tissue specimens were collected (60 minutes after drug administration). Serum and tissue drug concentrations were determined by microbiologic plate assay.

Results—Macroscopically, treatment rabbits had a high prevalence of arthropathy with the distal portion of the femur having the highest prevalence and severity of lesions. Grossly, alterations to articular cartilage included 1 to 4 mm in diameter vesicles or erosions. Histologically, vesicles were identified in the midzone or close to the zone of calcified cartilage of treatment rabbits. Chondrocyte cellularity was reduced in affected areas, and perivesicular regions had reduced staining with Safranin O. Correlation analysis of area under the curve values with total scores for lesion severity had a significant positive relationship.

Conclusions—Our findings support the use of juvenile rabbits as a model for arthropathic changes induced by fluoroquinolone administration. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61:1396–1402)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To verify the existence of intertransverse joints (ITJs) in young foals.

ANIMALS

11 warmblood foals.

PROCEDURES

Postmortem examination of the lumbar area in foals < 200 days old using CT, MRI, dissection, and histomorphology. Data were analyzed with descriptive statistics.

RESULTS

Age of foals varied between 1 and 200 days (median, 11 days). Ten foals had 6 lumbar (L) vertebrae, and 1 foal had 5. All 11 foals, irrespective of age, had ITJs between the first sacral and last lumbar vertebrae and between the last and second-to-last lumbar vertebrae. In 6 foals (all with 6 L vertebrae), ITJs also existed between the fourth and fifth L vertebra. One foal, also with 6 L vertebrae, additionally had a unilateral (right) ITJ between the transverse processes of the third and fourth L vertebra. Based on CT, width of ITJs was seemingly greater in young (< 1 month old) foals because of the incomplete ossification of the transverse processes. The ITJs were confirmed and further characterized by MRI, dissection, and histomorphology.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

ITJs already exist in very young warmblood foals and are present at birth. During the first months of life, these juvenile ITJs develop similarly to other synovial joints with increasing ossification and concomitant decrease of thickness of the cartilage layer. Knowledge of the presence of these ITJs in young animals is clinically relevant, as they should be recognized as nonpathologic when for instance a young foal is presented for presumed arthropathy and examined with advanced imaging techniques.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association