Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 134 items for :

  • "antinociception" x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All

hydromorphone hydrochloride in four-toed hedgehogs. We hypothesized that SC hydromorphone would provide antinociception lasting for several hours with minimal sedative effects in hedgehogs. We also hypothesized that hydromorphone would have a longer duration of

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

concentrations associated with antinociception in cats for more than an hour. 11 The antinociceptive or analgesic potential of hydromorphone was not assessed. Anecdotal reports 4 , 6 mention possible adverse effects, such as profound sedation, vomiting

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

inability to access the limbs in awake, defensive hedgehogs make SC injections more practical than IM and IV injections. Recent studies 2 , 3 have demonstrated that SC opioid administration can provide long-lasting antinociception in hedgehogs. Methadone

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

for pain be disregarded at any time. Morphine, which is primarily an MOR agonist (with DOR and KOR activities), induces antinociception in redeared slider turtles during exposure to a noxious thermal stimulus. 4 In contrast, butorphanol, which is

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

efficacy in a few reports. 16 , 17 Motor dysfunction may be a concern when local anesthetics are added; however, this can be prevented or minimized if lower doses of local anesthetics are used while still providing similar antinociception 19 or even

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

preoperative blockade of the femoral and sciatic nerves is as efficacious as a single injection preoperative administration of local anesthetics into the lumbosacral epidural space in providing intraoperative antinociception and postoperative analgesia

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To evaluate a carrageenan-induced inflammatory model in the cockatiel (Nymphicus hollandicus) using weight-bearing load, rotational perch locomotion, thermal threshold withdrawal, and footpad dimensions.

ANIMALS

16 adult cockatiels (8 males and 8 females).

PROCEDURES

Cockatiels were randomly assigned into 2 groups as either treatment (carrageenan injection; n = 8) or control (handling only; 8). Treatment of cockatiels involved unilateral subcutaneous injection of 0.05 mL of 1% lambda carrageenan solution into the left footpad. Control birds were handled in a similar manner without an injection. Following baseline measurements and treatment or control procedures, posttreatment measurements at multiple time points involving weight-bearing perch load (for up to 336 hours), locomotive abilities when placed on a rotating perch (for up to 96 hours), thermal withdrawal threshold (for the 24- to 30-hour period), and both vertical and horizontal left footpad size and degree of swelling (for up to 84 days) were obtained.

RESULTS

Treatment cockatiels had a significant decrease in left foot weight-bearing load and increase in left footpad dimensions and swelling grade over time compared to control cockatiels. Rotational perch locomotion and thermal withdrawal threshold, conversely, did not differ significantly between groups. Cockatiels injected with carrageenan returned to normal weight-bearing within 2 weeks; however, left footpad dimensions did not return to baseline.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Carrageenan footpad injection prompts a measurable and grossly visible inflammatory response in the cockatiel. Additionally, it induces alterations in weight-bearing distribution in injected birds. This model provides a method to evaluate inflammation and lameness in small psittacine species.

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

-derived dosages. However, to our knowledge, there are no clinical data to substantiate that butorphanol is an effective analgesic drug in reptiles. In contrast, there is minimal evidence that morphine provides antinociception in lizards and crocodiles, 6,7 but

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

anesthetic preparation, which is available commercially a as a 1:1 tiletamine-zolazepam formula that is used in many animal species. In llamas, administration of tiletamine-zolazepam (2 mg/kg, IM) induces only a brief period of antinociception 3 ; however

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

of the sedation and antinociception provided by medetomidine are also dose dependent, and the adverse effects increase with dose. 7,14,15 Vatinoxan, previously known as MK-467 and L-659'066, is an α 2 -adrenoceptor antagonist that poorly penetrates

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research