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T he Psittaciformes order contains some of the most popular species maintained in captivity in zoos or as companion animals. These species present diverse diseases whose diagnosis requires the use of complementary tests. Inhaled anesthesia has

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

ALT (89 IU/L; reference range, 17 to 78 IU/L), and increased serum AST (80 IU/L; reference range, 16 to 42 IU/L). Physical examination on the day of anesthesia revealed no abnormalities and no overt neurologic deficits or behavioral abnormalities

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

hemodynamic instability is less common in veterinary anesthesiology. Moreover, current imaging acquisition techniques for dogs do not always consider other factors frequently encountered when hemodynamic instability occurs during anesthesia, such as dorsal

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

. Complications in equine anesthesia . Vet Clin North Am Equine Pract 2008 ; 24 : 735 – 752 . 10.1016/j.cveq.2008.10.002 5. Clark L , Clutton RE , Blissitt KJ , et al. The effects of morphine on the recovery of horses from halothane anaesthesia

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

/min (reference range, 60 to 100 beats/min), and strong, regular femoral pulses. General anesthesia was induced with ketamine hydrochloride (2.0 mg/kg [0.9 mg/lb], IV bolus) followed immediately with propofol (1.4 mg/kg [0.6 mg/lb], IV) titrated slowly to effect

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

/lb/h], IV) for analgesia. Later that day, the patient was anesthetized for a CT myelogram. The patient was premedicated with fentanyl (3 μg/kg, IV) and lidocaine (1 mg/kg [0.45 mg/lb], IV). Anesthesia was induced with ketamine (5 mg/kg, IV) and midazolam (0

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Horses develop pronounced disturbances of gas exchange during anesthesia and recumbency. These disturbances are characterized by an increase in Pa CO 2 attributable to hypoventilation and by an increase in the (P[A–a] O 2 ). 1 The latter results

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

fentanyl was given, anesthesia was induced with ketamine (5 mg/kg, IV) and diazepam (0.25 mg/kg [0.1 mg/lb], IV). A 4-mm, cuffed endotracheal tube with a Murphy eye was inserted in the trachea with the aid of direct laryngoscopy and the tip advanced to the

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective

To devise and test an IV methohexital infusion regimen for induction and maintenance of surgical anesthesia in dogs from which they would rapidly recover.

Design

Dose-response and plasma concentration-effect study.

Animals

11 clinically normal dogs.

Procedure

Bolus methohexital pharmacokinetic variables were determined in ketamine- and pentobarbital-anesthetized dogs. Plasma methohexital concentrations required to inhibit purposeful movement in response to painful stimuli were determined during a stepped methohexital infusion in the same dogs on a second occasion. These pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic data were next used to design a bolus and two-stage infusion regimen that would result in stable plasma methohexital concentrations with prolonged infusion. This regimen was tested in a second group of dogs.

Results

Mean steady-state volume of distribution of methohexital in the anesthetized dogs was 1.50 L/kg of body weight and mean elimination clearance was 10.2 ml/kg/min. Mean plasma concentrations required to prevent movement response to a noxious stimulus and at which the dogs could be extubated were 11.8 and 6.9 μg/ml, respectively. After a 6-hour infusion, recovery of airway reflexes sufficient to allow extubation required 67 minutes.

Conclusions

An easily implemented IV methohexital infusion regimen for induction and maintenance anesthesia in dogs was developed. During a 6-hour infusion, hemodynamic variables did not change. Use of this regimen resulted in anesthesia of sufficient depth to prevent withdrawal in response to noxious stimuli and in reliable and acceptable emergence times for use in canine survival studies in a cost-effective manner. (Am J Vet Res 1996;57:1044–1049)

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

study to evaluate the effect of peribulbar block or topical application of local anesthesia combined with general anesthesia on intra-operative and post-operative complications during paediatric strabismus surgery . Anaesthesia 2007 ; 62 : 1110

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association