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Introduction Adverse events can result from administration of any medication or product. These events can present clinically as a range of signs from mild (eg, lethargy or injection site soreness) to severe (eg, anaphylactic shock or death

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Adverse events and medical errors in veterinary and human medicine are inevitable, and research has only just begun to shed light on the prevalence of these incidents. 1 Medical errors can include those involving medications (eg, wrong medication

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

AE reporting. 8,9 For each report, an AE reporting checklist score between 0 and 14 was generated by awarding 1 point for each checklist item fulfilled. Adverse events were defined per Ioannidis et al 1 as “side effects that are harmful.” Clinical

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

of human vaccine safety. 7,8 Such databases allow for investigation of relatively infrequent adverse events, supply denominator data on vaccine doses given, and provide appropriate comparison groups. 9 A large veterinary practice database was used

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

processes, including brachycephalic obstructive airway syndrome and gastrointestinal dysfunction, which can affect their daily life and are assumed to be linked to increased adverse events in hospital including aspiration pneumonia and regurgitation. 2 – 4

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Introduction Chemotherapy is widely used to treat pet dogs and cats with cancer. It is generally considered to be safe and tolerable for most pets. Anecdotal reports suggest that < 25% of pets experience chemotherapy-related adverse events

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

in 17 dogs with osteosarcoma. The authors reported comparable chemotherapy-related adverse events and an MST of 365 days. 14 The purpose of the present study was to evaluate adverse events and outcomes in dogs with appendicular osteosarcoma treated

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

improvements to immune status are not readily discernible. Adverse events (AEs) or undesired side effects believed to be associated with vaccination are noted by owners, often contributing to reduced acceptance of that vaccine or of vaccines in general. 1

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

vaccines now also contain L interrogans serovar Pomona and L kirschneri serovar Grippotyphosa bacterins. 9 However, small animal veterinary practitioners have expressed concern about the safety of Leptospira vaccines. Adverse events associated with

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine the incidence of adverse events in ferrets vaccinated with a modified-live avian cell culture canine distemper virus vaccine licensed for use in ferrets, an inactivated rabies vaccine licensed for use in ferrets, or both.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—143 ferrets.

Procedure—Medical records were reviewed to identify ferrets that had an adverse event after vaccination.

Results—Adverse events developed within 25 minutes after vaccination in 13 ferrets. One ferret developed an adverse event after receiving a distemper and a rabies vaccine simultaneously and developed a second adverse event the following year after receiving the rabies vaccine alone. Therefore, a total of 14 adverse events were identified. All adverse events were an anaphylactic reaction characterized by generalized hyperemia, hypersalivation, and vomiting. Ten of the 14 anaphylactic reactions occurred after ferrets received both vaccines, 3 occurred after ferrets received the distemper vaccine alone, and 1 occurred after a ferret received the rabies vaccine alone. Incidences of adverse events after administration of both vaccines, the distemper vaccine alone, and the rabies vaccine alone were 5.6, 5.9, and 5.6%, respectively. Ferrets that had an anaphylactic reaction were significantly older at the time of vaccination than were ferrets that did not.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that there may be a high incidence of anaphylactic reactions after vaccination of domestic ferrets. Ferrets should be observed for at least 25 minutes after vaccination, and veterinarians who vaccinate ferrets should be prepared to treat anaphylactic reactions. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2003;223:663–665)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association