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macroscopically appeared clinically normal. Results of histologic examination of the mass were consistent with adenocarcinoma of the exocrine pancreas. The mass had intralesional hemorrhage, necrosis, and desmoplasia. Neoplastic cells contained bright pink zymogen

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

might suggest mineralization ( Figure 3 ). Differential diagnoses of the pancreas were neoplasia, such as adenocarcinoma, or less likely pancreatitis. There were some hypoechoic nodules on the peritoneum, which might be suggestive of peritoneal

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
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exocrine adenocarcinoma. Neoplastic cells were detected at the surgical margins of the mass. On histologic examination, the biopsy specimen of the pancreatic tissue adjacent to the mass had a normal appearance and did not contain any neoplastic features

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

intestinal adenocarcinoma causing colonic obstruction. A—Notice the feces-filled ascending colon with a section of luminal narrowing (arrow) in the distal portion of the descending colon. B—Notice the luminal stenosis (asterisk). A marking catheter with

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

hematoidin in addition to variably sized areas of mineralization. The neoplastic cells invaded the fibrous capsule and extended to the submitted margins. This interpretation was diagnostic for a thyroid gland adenocarcinoma. Given the increase in serum T 4

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

of these findings, a histologic diagnosis of renal adenocarcinoma was made, confirming the clinical suspicion. Figure 3 Representative photomicrograph of a section from the right kidney in a region distant from the renal nodule. The cortex is

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Apocrine gland anal sac adenocarcinoma is an uncommon tumor in cats. 1 In fact, the veterinary literature contains only 4 single-cat case reports, 2–5 1 case series 6 of 4 cats, and a large retrospective study 7 of 64 cats in which AGASACA is

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

affect the anal sacs in dogs, but are even more rare, with squamous cell carcinoma having been reported in 5 dogs, 4 papillary cystadenoma in 1, 5 and malignant melanoma in 2. 5,6 Anal sac apocrine gland adenocarcinomas arise from the apocrine glands

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Introduction Multiple prognostic indicators have been reported for dogs with apocrine gland anal sac adenocarcinoma (AGASACA), including disease stage, hypercalcemia, histopathologic features, and treatment performed. 1 – 6 Primary AGASACA

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association