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Introduction Sepsis-induced acute kidney injury (AKI) is a frequent, well-documented complication in critically ill human patients and is associated with an increased risk of mortality. 1 – 3 While research on sepsis-induced AKI in veterinary

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Introduction Sudden renal parenchymal damage due to a variety of etiologies (eg, ureteral obstruction, pyelonephritis, renal ischemia, toxicosis) is an important clinical condition in cats resulting in acute kidney injury (AKI). Considering

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

within the RI. On the basis of the results of the diagnostic tests and imaging, the diagnosis was left-sided congestive heart failure with acute kidney injury. Figure 1 Two-dimensional color-flow Doppler echocardiographic images acquired from a left

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

as biomarkers of AKI and their possible cutoff points, and they should be investigated in clinical studies. A bbreviations ACP Acid phosphatase AKI Acute kidney injury ALP Alkaline phosphatase ARF Acute renal failure GGT γ

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Acute kidney injury is an abrupt decline in renal function that results in a life-threatening condition in dogs. In young dogs, mild AKI is often self-resolving and the damaged function of the kidney is restored. 1 However, AKI causes severe

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Acute kidney injury involves a rapid loss of renal function and is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates in humans and other animals. 1,2 Toxic injuries caused by chemical or chemotherapeutic agents are the major cause of AKI. 1

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Introduction Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a debilitating condition, associated with high morbidity and mortality in both veterinary and human patients. 1 , 2 Metabolic disturbances, fluid imbalance, electrolyte abnormalities, hypertension

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

information for referring veterinarians and specialists when counseling an owner on whether IHD is an appropriate choice for the patient. ABBREVIATIONS AKI Acute kidney injury CI Confidence interval CKD Chronic kidney disease IHD Intermittent

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Atherosclerosis is a chronic lipid-driven inflammatory disease of the arterial wall. Due to its cardiovascular ischemic complications, it is one of the most common causes of death in people. However, atherosclerosis is seldomly reported in dogs.

ANIMAL

A 10-year-old male mixed-breed dog.

CLINICAL PRESENTATION, PROGRESSION, AND PROCEDURES

Severe acute kidney injury associated with thrombosis of the abdominal aorta.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME

Treatment included renal replacement therapy, antithrombotic therapy, and supportive care. However, the dog developed neurological and respiratory complications and was euthanized due to worsening kidney function and lack of improvement of the thrombosis. Postmortem examination confirmed the presence of aortic thromboembolism and renal infarcts. Histology revealed severe chronic-active atherosclerosis of the distal aorta and renal arteries.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Aortic thrombosis is uncommon in dogs, and it is often associated with underlying conditions such as protein-losing nephropathy, endocrine disorders, cardiac disease, or hypercoagulability. In this case, no specific underlying cause was identified and atherosclerosis was considered the primary cause of the thrombosis.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

In the report “Evaluation of autologous bone marrow–derived mesenchymal stem cells on renal regeneration after experimentally induced acute kidney injury in dogs” ( Am J Vet Res 2016;77:208–217), the address for Dr. Jae-Ik Han is incorrect

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research