Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 22 items for :

  • "accelerometry" x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All

expenditure . Med Sci Sports Exer 1998 ; 31 : 747 – 754 . 6. Plasqui G Joosen AMCP Kester AD , et al. Measuring free-living energy expenditure and physical activity with triaxial accelerometry . Obes Res 2005 ; 13 : 1363 – 1369 . 10.1038/oby

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

, in addition to collected accelerometry data, were then used to guide the activity monitor’s proprietary pDER calculation. During the 28-day study, each owner tracked their dog’s daily caloric intake including all meals, treats, and medications

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To measure the trunk vertical displacement (VD) in horses trotting on a water treadmill (WT) at different water depths (WDs) and speeds.

ANIMALS

6 sound Standardbred horses (median age 12 years [IQR:10.5-12]).

METHODS

The horses were trotted on a WT at 2 speeds (3.5 m/s and 5 m/s) and during 4 conditions: dry treadmill (DT), WD at mid-cannon (WD-CAN), mid-radius (WD-RAD), and shoulder (WD-SHOUL). The dorsoventral movement was obtained with accelerometers placed over the withers, thoracolumbar junction (T18), tuber sacrale (TS), and sacrum (S5). The VD was defined with the median value of the upward (Up) and downward (Down) amplitudes of the vertical excursion during each stride. The difference of VD at each sensor location was compared between the DT and the 3 WDs, and between the 2 trotting speeds for the same condition.

RESULTS

The VD amplitudes were significantly increased at any sensor location when trotting in water at WD-CAN and WD-RAD compared to DT (P < .05 for all), with the highest increase at WD-RAD and T18. When the speed increased from 3.5 to 5 m/s, the VD amplitudes were significantly decreased at T18 at each water level (P = .03), and at WD-RAD only for the withers and TS (P = .03).

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Both water depth and speed affect the trunk VD in horses at trot on a WT with an opposite effect. The VD increases when increasing the WD up to mid-radius, while the VD decreases when increasing the trotting speed, with the main effects observed at the thoracolumbar junction.

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

, accelerometry has been used to determine the effects of sedation on the movement patterns of horses. 12 Accelerometers are assessment devices that measure acceleration of the surface to which they are attached 13 ; they measure the instantaneous change of

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

compliance with the feeding plan was discussed with the owner, and if weight loss was < 1% or > 2%, the dog's daily feeding allowance was adjusted (increased or decreased) by 10%. Accelerometry Each dog had a waterproof triaxial accelerometer c

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

activity monitor m at the time of discharge from the hospital and at 2, 8, 12, 16, and 24 weeks after surgery, for 1 wk/time point. The accelerometry monitor was placed in a small pouch attached to a harness at the dorsal midline between the shoulders of

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

-related quality of life in dogs with cardiac disease . J Am Vet Med Assoc 2005 ; 226 : 1864 – 1868 . 10.2460/javma.2005.226.1864 16 Kumahara H Schultz Y Ayabe M , et al . The use of uniaxial accelerometry for the assessment of physical

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

of human movements) with a wide range accelerometry (± 8 g ); no other filters or algorithms were applied. 30 , 31 Data collection was set to start and end when the IMU was undocked and then redocked, respectively. The IMU docking station was

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

, Marchetti GF , et al. A comparison of accelerometry and center of pressure measures during computerized dynamic posturography: a measure of balance . Gait Posture 2011 ; 33 : 594 – 599 . 10.1016/j.gaitpost.2011.01.015 14. Masani K , Vette AH

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research