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complication of dental disease is the formation of odontogenic abscesses and secondary osteomyelitis. 8 , 9 While odontogenic abscesses are common in rabbits, the pathophysiology is not currently well understood. 10 – 12 Although dental disease and

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abdominal abscesses occur infrequently in adult horses and can be classified as primary or secondary in origin. 1 Primary abdominal abscesses originate from a systemic bacterial infection 1 and include sequelae to infectious diseases of the

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

A 1-year-old sexually intact female Netherland dwarf rabbit ( Oryctolagus cuniculus) with a 3-week history of signs of lethargy, decreased appetite, left unilateral exophthalmia, a resolved draining sinus from a left maxillary facial abscess, and

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Dental abscesses in humans have been defined according to their infection source as endodontal or periapical abscesses, periodontal abscesses, and pericoronal abscesses. 1 The dental abscess is not a homogeneous clinical entity for the reason

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

herniation at the foramen magnum. Differential diagnoses that were considered included hydrocephalus, neoplasia, parasitic cyst, and abscess. The cria was anesthetized with a combination of diazepam, ketamine, and sevoflurane, and magnetic resonance imaging

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Introduction A sublumbar abscess is an uncommon lesion in small animals, more frequently encountered in dogs than in cats. 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 , 5 , 6 , 7 , 8 The iliopsoas muscles are most commonly affected, but the epaxial muscles can also be

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

gram-negative rods; findings were consistent with an intra-abdominal abscess. Treatment with doxycycline (10 mg/kg, PO, q 12 h) was continued with the addition of metronidazole (25 mg/kg [11.4 mg/lb], PO, q 8 h) administration to treat infection by

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
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presumptive diagnosis of mastitis with abscessation of mammary glands and early sepsis was made. Because of the history of mammary gland enlargement beginning in early pregnancy, an underlying disease process was suspected; mammary neoplasia and FAH were

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

vulgaris ; moderate growth of Bacteroides sp (not Bacteroides fragilis ); and light growth of Proteus mirabilis . No fungal organisms or other etiologic agents were observed. A preliminary diagnosis of abscess was made. Antimicrobial sensitivities

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

of dental spurs. 1 , 2 Periapical odontogenic infections are a common sequela to dental disease in rabbits and are defined as abscess formation in the periapical region of the tooth. 1 – 3 If the periapical abscess is associated with maxillary teeth

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association