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Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To provide a video tutorial detailing how to perform “blind” and ultrasound-guided abdominocentesis for diagnostic and therapeutic guidance, and to provide a brief demonstration of intra-abdominal pressure measurement (IAP).

ANIMALS

Any cat or dog with suspicion of free abdominal effusion or patients requiring measurement of IAP.

METHODS

Abdominocentesis should be performed when there is high suspicion for peritoneal effusion based on physical exam and/or diagnostic imaging. The 4-quadrant tap uses 20-gauge or larger needles placed blindly in ≥ 1 of the 4 quadrants of the abdomen to collect abdominal fluid. In contrast, ultrasound allows visualization of fluid in the abdomen prior to percutaneous insertion of a needle and syringe to collect fluid. Regardless of collection technique, fluid should have immediate cytologic analysis and later can be submitted for biochemical parameters, additional cellular analysis by a pathologist, and culture and sensitivity (in rare cases if indicated). Intravesicular bladder pressure measurement using a manometer–urinary catheter system approximates the IAP when there is concern for organ hypoperfusion and compartment syndrome.

RESULTS

Abdominocentesis can be performed with and without the use of ultrasound guidance. Intravesicular bladder pressure measurement is used to diagnose and trend IAP values before and after treatments are performed.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Abdominocentesis is a simple and safe technique that all small animal clinicians should be comfortable performing. Effusion sampling can guide further diagnostics and treatments. Measurement of IAP is simple and requires no specialized equipment.

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

collection technique could lead to health complications for the patient. Similar to cattle, abdominocentesis performed in the cranioventral region of the abdomen in camelids bore the risk of puncture into the gastrointestinal tract or interference from the

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Authors and

dyspnea was evident at rest, and crackles were detected via auscultation of the lungs and air sacs. Abdominocentesis was performed to alleviate the bird's dyspnea. Eleven milliliters of clear yellow fluid was aspirated via abdominocentesis, and a sample

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

present on palpation. Serum biochemical analysis, abdominocentesis, abdominal radiography, and abdominal ultrasonography were subsequently performed. Clinicopathologic abnormalities included azotemia with high BUN concentration (> 100 mg/dL; reference

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

(serum chloride concentration < 95 mEq/L) was detected in 7 of 9 cattle. Peritonitis was confirmed by cytologic examination of abdominal fluid obtained via abdominocentesis in all 4 of the cattle that underwent the procedure. Rumen chloride

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

they were to be euthanized for research purposes unrelated to the gastrointestinal system. Foals and adult horses were included in the colic group if they were admitted to the hospital for colic and had abdominocentesis as part of their initial clinical

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

comfortably. Further abdominal ultrasound revealed splenomegaly with a suspected 10-cm hematoma cranioventrally in the parenchyma, suggesting the spleen as the source of hemorrhage. An ultrasound-guided abdominocentesis was performed to ensure the spleen was

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

was performed, and 600 mL of hemorrhagic effusion was aspirated to alleviate the clinical signs. Abdominocentesis was performed to alleviate the ascites, and 5.5 L of serosanguineous fluid was removed. No cytologic or fluid analysis was performed for

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

The effect of right paralumbar fossa exploratory celiotomy and omentopexy on peritoneal fluid constituents was studied in 22 adult dairy cows. Six cows were eliminated on the basis of physical examination findings (n = 2), surgical findings (n = 2), or inability to obtain a sufficient volume of peritoneal fluid (n = 2). Sixteen cattle had normal results of cbc and serum biochemical analysis, and a minimum of 1 ml of peritoneal fluid was obtained by abdominocentesis. Abdominocentesis was repeated on days 1, 2, and 6 after surgery. Statistical analysis for repeated measures was performed, using a significance level of P < 0.05. Stage of gestation was evaluated for interaction with time.

Mean total nucleated cell count was 3,200 cells/μl before surgery, was significantly increased 2 days after surgery (16,336 cells/μl), and continued to increase through day 6 (20,542 cells/μl). Mean polymorphonuclear cell count was 1,312 cells/μl before surgery and was significantly higher at 2 (11,043 cells/μl) and 6 (10,619 cells/μl) days after surgery. Mean lymphocyte count was 254 cells/μl before surgery and was significantly increased 2 days (1,911 cells/μl) after surgery. By day 6, lymphocyte numbers were similar to preoperative values. Mean mononuclear cell count was 770 cells/μl before surgery and was significantly increased on days 1 (3,084 cells/μl), 2 (3,285 cells/μl), and 6 (2,349 cells/μl) after surgery. Mean eosinophil numbers were 1,388 cells/μl before surgery and were significantly increased on day 6 (6,347 cells/μl) only. Interaction between time and stage of gestation was found only for specific gravity and total protein concentration. In general, specific gravity and total protein concentration increased after surgery (mean before surgery, 1.016 and 3.6 g/dl; mean after surgery, 1.021 and 5.6 g/dl). Left paralumbar fossa celiotomy performed 7 days after surgery did not reveal complications of repeated abdominocentesis, and pregnancy status was unchanged.

Peritoneal fluid constituents are highly variable after exploratory celiotomy and omentopexy in cattle. However, results of this study may provide a reference for interpretation of postoperative peritoneal fluid sample findings in cattle.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine the outcome of and prognostic indicators for dogs and cats with pneumoperitoneum and no history of penetrating trauma.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—43 dogs and 11 cats.

Procedure—Medical records of dogs and cats with radiographic evidence of pneumoperitoneum and no history of penetrating trauma were reviewed. Information collected included signalment, previous medical problems, initial complaint, duration of illness, physical examination findings, radiographic findings, laboratory abnormalities, abdominocentesis results, bacterial culture results, concurrent diseases, hospitalization time, and outcome. Abdominal radiographs were reviewed, and radiographic severity of pneumoperitoneum was classified. For those animals that underwent exploratory laparotomy, time from admission to surgery and results of histologic examination of biopsy specimens were recorded.

Results—24 (44%) animals survived and were discharged from the hospital, but none of the variables examined was associated with whether animals survived. Rupture of the gastrointestinal tract was the cause of pneumoperitoneum in 40 animals. However, cause and location of gastrointestinal tract rupture was not associated with whether animals survived. Twenty-three of 40 (58%) animals that underwent exploratory laparotomy survived, compared with only 1 of 14 animals that did not undergo surgery.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that pneumoperitoneum in dogs and cats without any history of penetrating trauma is most commonly associated with rupture of the gastrointestinal tract and requires immediate surgical intervention. Even when appropriate treatment is instituted, the shortterm prognosis is only fair. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2004;225:251–255)

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association